asian-tiger-mosquito

A Mosquito is a Mosquito is a Mosquito

The Asian Tiger mosquito can be easily identified by the white and black stripes on its legs and abdomen.

The Asian Tiger mosquito can be easily identified by the white and black stripes on its legs and abdomen.

Right? Well, not really. While it’s true that all mosquito bites hurt, make us miserable, and have the potential of spreading diseases, mosquitoes themselves are actually quite different from one another if we look at them closely. Here in Southern New Hampshire, our environment actually contains 47 different species of mosquitoes, each with unique characteristics. But out of these 47, only a few are responsible for the spreading West Nile virus and Eastern Equine Encephalitis (EEE). The two biggest culprits are the Asian Tiger Mosquito (Aedes albopictus) and the Cattail Mosquito (Coquillettidia perturbans).

The Asian Tiger mosquito is a relatively recent arrival in the United States. Originally a native of tropical climates, it came to our shores in used tires that were imported from the tropics. These mosquitoes are particularly troublesome because they carry West Nile virus and, unlike many others, are active during daylight hours. Asian Tiger mosquitoes are easily identified by black and white stripes in their legs and abdomen.

While all mosquitoes love water, the Cattail mosquito is especially fond of it. In their larval form, these mosquitoes attach themselves to the roots of water plants. They are able to breath underwater, making them impossible to eliminate with larvicides (since larvicides drown mosquito eggs).  These mosquitoes are prone to transmitting EEE and can travel up to a mile at a time. They are brown or tan with darker brown stripes on their legs and abdomen.

No matter what mosquitoes are most prevalent on your property, they all have the following in common:

  • They need water to breed
  • Only the female can bite
  • Their wings beat 300 to 600 times per second
  • They can fly about 1 to 1.5 miles per hour
  • They can smell humans from 60 feet away
Mosquito Squad of SONH

The team at Mosquito Squad of SoNH

And no matter the mosquito species, Mosquito Squad of Southern New Hampshire can help you control them. We use a variety of methods to ensure that we eliminate mosquitoes no matter where they are in their lifecycle. This ensures that we are not only protecting you and your family, but we are also decreasing the mosquito population at large, which is extremely important with the arrival of spring and summer.  So don’t wait until you get bitten. Be proactive.  Give us a call today or come visit us at the NH State Home Show, booth #1202,  this weekend at the Radisson Center of Central New Hampshire to talk to us about protecting your family this season.  • (603) 373 – 8863 • email: sonh@mosquitosquad.com

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As mosquitoes all around Southern New Hampshire test positive for WNV, anxiety continues to grow for residents

Blood filled female mosquito

West Nile Virus detected in Stratham, Sandown and Pelham, which has raised concern among NH residents.

As reports come in regards to mosquito-borne illness activity going on all around us, Southern New Hampshire residents are getting more anxious. The newest positive test results for West Nile Virus indicate the virus has been detected in two mosquito pools in Stratham, N.H., making it at least the third community in the state this summer where the virus has surfaced. This new location comes to us after the virus was also identifed last week in nearby Sandown, mosquito samples taken from a testing pool have tested positive for West Nile Virus. According to a report in the Eagle Tribune, the timing for this discovery couldn’t have gotten much worse. The positive test results that indicate the presence of WNV in the Sandown community came on the eve of the annual summer event “Old Home Days“, which has become a tradition in Sandown and the surrounding communities. With the festivities in town and with a lot of people being outside this past weekend. Officials said they would rather be safe than sorry and began emergency spraying for mosquitoes throughout the town prior to the event. Town officials said parts of the town are typically sprayed for mosquitoes, but the spraying is happening earlier in the year than usual, which seems to be the case all over the area as other positive test results continue to grow. Last year Sandown was the first town in the state to test positive for West Nile Virus.

WNV warning sign

In addition to utilizing a mosquito control and protection program at home, avoid areas where mosquitoes are prevalent.

The positive WNV results come in just a short time after two mosquito pools in Pelham also tested positive for the virus. Officials are quick to point out that mosquito season in New Hampshire reaches peak level around Labor Day. Mosquito activity in NH generally offers no relief until mid-October, and in keeping with years past sometimes mosquitoes will continue to be a source of concern until the arrival of the season’s first snow. With this in mind, it is important to remain vigilant in exercising safe mosquito practices at home and abroad.

In our region, human infections of mosquito-borne illnesses such as West Nile Virus and Eastern Equine Encephalitis make top news during the summer months. As of yet, there have been no reports of Eastern Equine Encephalits for this season.

It can sometimes be hard to initially identify the presence of the disease because some cases are asymptomatic, which means the individual infected may show no symptoms of being ill. Being infected with West Nile Virus can also take those infected down two very different paths, one being the development of West Nile Fever and the other turning into West Nile Disease.

asian-tiger-mosquito

The day biting Asian tiger mosquito is a known vector of West Nile Virus.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), It is estimated that about 20% of people who become infected with WNV will develop West Nile fever. Symptoms include fever, headache, tiredness, and body aches, occasionally with a skin rash (on the trunk of the body) and swollen lymph glands. While the illness can be as short as a few days, even healthy people have reported being sick for several weeks. The symptoms of severe disease (also called neuroinvasive disease, such as West Nile encephalitis or meningitis or West Nile poliomyelitis) include headache, high fever, neck stiffness, stupor, disorientation, coma, tremors, convulsions, muscle weakness, and paralysis. It is estimated that approximately 1 in 150 persons infected with the West Nile virus will develop a more severe form of disease. Serious illness can occur in people of any age; however people over age 50 and some immunocompromised persons (for example, transplant patients) are at the highest risk for getting severely ill when infected with WNV. Most people (about 4 out of 5) who are infected with West Nile virus will not develop any type of illness (an asymptomatic infection); however you cannot know ahead of time if you’ll get sick or not when infected.

Mosquito Squad mosquito free backyard

Keep your family safe from the risk of mosquito-borne illness this season!

During this most crucial time of the season, when the potential to contract a mosquito-borne illness is at its peak, it’s important for NH residents to reduce the risk of coming into contact with a mosquito altogether. The truth is you never know which mosquitoes could be carrying West Nile, and which are not. The best prevention against all mosquito related illnesses is to exercise efficient mosquito control and prevention practices. Mosquito Squad of Southern New Hampshire can eliminate and prevent the resurgence of mosquitoes on your property all season long with our barrier spray program. Our safe and effective barrier spray will eliminate what mosquitoes are present and prevent resurgence for 21 days. Getting started is easy and worry free. Our rotation program ensures mosquito control all summer long and you won’t have to play guessing games about mosquitoes any longer!

Mosquito Squad of SONH

The team at Mosquito Squad of SoNH

Contact Mosquito Squad of Southern New Hampshire to learn more about and our highly effective barrier spray program. Live mosquito free or die. Call now for a free quote • (603) 373 – 8863 • email: sonh@mosquitosquad.com and start living the

West Nile Virus in New Hamphire- the whole story.

Summer fun mosquito free

Summer fun should be mosquito free!

As a child, I can recall long summer days of carefree outdoor fun that spilled over into the evening hours. Getting bitten by a mosquito was always part of the equation, and so were the whelps and discomfort that followed. Not so very long ago mosquito-borne illness wasn’t a concern our parents worried much about on those fun summer evenings. The only concern of seasonal mosquitoes was the chance of infection from scratching the itchy bites too much. Things have drastically changed in a short period of time when it comes to the way we view mosquitoes.

Fast forward to the present and the many mosquito-borne illnesses we have to consider each time we venture outdoors into an unprotected area and you will realize the impetus of exercising mosquito smart practices.  One of the most prevalent causes for concern is the risk of West Nile Virus. West Nile Virus is a mosquito-borne disease that can cause a mild fever to encephalitis (swelling of the brain) or meningitis (swelling of the membranes surrounding the brain and spinal cord) in humans and other mammals. The West Nile Virus cycle is maintained in nature between mosquitoes and birds, the latter serving as reservoir hosts. The mosquito becomes infected by biting a bird that carries the virus. An infected mosquito can also spread the virus to healthy birds as well. Overwintering adult mosquitoes can harbor the virus and thereby serve as one way of sustaining the disease year to year.

mosquito squad mosquito

Last year the CDC reported a total of 5,674 cases of WNV disease in people, including 286 deaths.

West Nile was first detected in North America in 1999 in New York City.  Prior to 1999, the illness had only been found in Africa, Eastern Europe, and West Asia. When the outbreak in 1999 took place researchers initially thought it might be St. Louis Encephalitis. During the same time researchers were observing human cases, they also noted an increase in avian mortality including wild crows and exotic birds at The Bronx Zoo. This occurrence was a call to alarm, because St. Louis Encephalitis has never shown a trend in avian mortality.  Other pathogenic arboviruses were investigated as the cause of this unusual phenomenon but, subsequent DNA sequencing of human and avian viral isolates indicated that they were closely related to West Nile (WN) Virus, not previously isolated in the Western Hemisphere. This event marked the beginning of things to come in terms of WNV infection. In 2012, all 48 contiguous states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico reported WNV infections in people, birds, or mosquitoes. According to the New Hampshire Department of Health and Human Services Division of Public Health Services nationally, there has been a dramatic increase in West Nile Virus activity since 2002, including infections reported in New Hampshire.

Mosquito eggs

Reducing the risk of contracting West Nile begins with eliminating areas where mosquitoes breed and lay their eggs.

In our region, human infections of mosquito-borne illnesses such as West Nile Virus and Eastern Equine Encephalitis are as commonplace in the news during the summer months as the prediction of a summer thunderstorm. It can sometimes be hard to initially identify the presence of the disease because some cases are asymptomatic, which means the individual infected may show no symptoms of being ill. Being infected with West Nile Virus can also take those infected down two very different paths, one being the development of West Nile Fever and the other turning into West Nile Disease.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), It is estimated that about 20% of people who become infected with WNV will develop West Nile fever. Symptoms include fever, headache, tiredness, and body aches, occasionally with a skin rash (on the trunk of the body) and swollen lymph glands. While the illness can be as short as a few days, even healthy people have reported being sick for several weeks. The symptoms of severe disease (also called neuroinvasive disease, such as West Nile encephalitis or meningitis or West Nile poliomyelitis) include headache, high fever, neck stiffness, stupor, disorientation, coma, tremors, convulsions, muscle weakness, and paralysis. It is estimated that approximately 1 in 150 persons infected with the West Nile virus will develop a more severe form of disease. Serious illness can occur in people of any age; however people over age 50 and some immunocompromised persons (for example, transplant patients) are at the highest risk for getting severely ill when infected with WNV. Most people (about 4 out of 5) who are infected with West Nile virus will not develop any type of illness (an asymptomatic infection); however you cannot know ahead of time if you’ll get sick or not when infected.

Mosquitoes suck

Mosquitoes suck, and so do the diseases they carry!

The best prevention against West Nile, and other mosquito related illnesses is to exercise efficient mosquito control and prevention practices. Mosquito Squad of Southern New Hampshire can eradicate and prevent the resurgence of mosquitoes on your property all season long with our barrier spray program. Our safe and effective barrier spray will kill what mosquitoes are present and prevent resurgence for 21 days. Getting started is easy and worry free. Our rotation program ensures mosquito control all summer long.

Mosquito Squad of SONH

The team at Mosquito Squad of SoNH

Contact Mosquito Squad of Southern New Hampshire to learn more about and our safe and effective barrier spray program. Live mosquito free or die. Call now (603) 373 – 8863 • email: sonh@mosquitosquad.comto start living the mosquito free life.

Rain, rain, go away

Southern New Hampshire has received between 4.5 and 9 inches of rain over the last 2 days.  This type of rainfall will create the flood areas needed to allow some forms of mosquito eggs to hatch.  These eggs can go years before hatching.  If the correct (flood) conditions occur they are then able to complete that part of their life cycle.  Keep yourself, your pets, and your family protected.  Mosquito Squad has several ways of keeping mosquitoes away from your property.

New Hampshire State Parks offer great mosquito advice

The New Hampshire State Park Association released some very good advice on preventing mosquito bites.  It explains that both Eastern Equine Encephalitis and West Nile disease are predominately spread by mosquitoes.  You can read the full article here.  Another great way to protect your family all year long is through the highly effective and affordable barrier treatments offered by Mosquito Squad!  A Mosquito Squad professional in your area will gladly give great advice to help keep those troublesome, and possibly dangerous, pests at bay.