The Triple Punch from Mosquitoes in Southern New Hampshire

mosquito squad mosquito

We can keep your backyard free of these this season.

Mosquitoes in Southern New Hampshire are capable of pulling a punch with the diseases they can transmit. In fact, here in Southern New Hampshire, they can actually pull a triple punch with three mosquito-borne illness that can be found in our area. It’s important to know the symptoms of these diseases and how to control the mosquito population in your Southern New Hampshire yard. Let’s start with the three mosquito-borne viruses and their symptoms:

Mosquito-Borne Diseases in Southern New Hampshire

Disease West Nile Virus Easter Equine Encephalitis Chikungunya
Symptoms Fever, headache, body aches, joint pain, vomiting, diarrhea, and rash. Chills, Fever, Joint Paint, and Muscle Pain.   More severe symptoms include headache, irritability, restlessness, drowsiness, vomiting, diarrhea, convulsions, and coma. Fever, joint pain, muscle pain, headache, nausea, fatigue and rash
Duration of Symptoms Several weeks to months depending on the severity of infection. 1-2 weeks for systemic infections or longer for more serious cases or the disease may be fatal. Several days to a few weeks although joint pain can last for years.
Treatment There is no vaccine or specific treatment for WNV. Over the counter pain medication, fluids, and rest are recommended. There is no vaccine for EEE for humans. Medication, fluids, and rest are the best treatment. Hospitalization may be required, especially if the infection is severe. There is no vaccine for Chikungunya although one is in the works. Over the counter pain medication and rest are recommended.

 

While each of the diseases can be painful and eventually can become more serious, each can also be avoided with proper mosquito control by Mosquito Squad of Southern New Hampshire. Our barrier spray reduces the

Mosquito Squad of SONH

The team at Mosquito Squad of SoNH

mosquito population in your treated yard by up to 90%, and lasts for 21 days, even through the rain. Call us now for season long protection against Southern New Hampshire mosquitoes and the diseases they can transmit to your family with just one bit. Mosquito Squad of Southern New Hampshire is ready to protect you from the triple punch of mosquitoes.

 

Mosquito Squad of Southern New Hampshire
(603) 373 – 8863

Triple Protection Against Mosquitoes in Your Southern New Hampshire Yard

Happy Memorial Day from Mosquito Squad of SoNH

Happy Memorial Day from Mosquito Squad of SoNH

The entire Mosquito Squad of Southern New Hampshire team hopes you had an enjoyable and reflective Memorial Day weekend honoring our fallen hero’s and thanking those who continue to protect us. Memorial Day commemorates those who sacrificed for us but also marks the start of summer vacation and unfortunately, mosquito season. The kids will soon be out of school so now is the time to get your mosquito control secured so you can protect them all summer long.

 

If you attended a celebratory cookout, neighborhood party or family reunion, did you notice any uninvited guest nibbling not on the pasta salad but on your arm? Those annoying pests are mosquitoes and they are out in Southern New Hampshire. Protecting your family from painful mosquito bites and the diseases they carry like West Nile virus should start early. Mosquito Squad of Southern New Hampshire is ready to start that defense with our triple-protection barrier spray treatment. Here’s how it works:

 

Triple protection against mosquitoes

Triple protection against mosquitoes

Level 1: Our barrier spray is applies to the shrubbery in your yard where mosquitoes rest and feed off the plant juices. Once the mosquitoes land on the foliage, they are eliminated on contact.

 

Level 2: Our barrier spray binds to that vegetation and our time-released formula remains effective for 21 days, eradicating any mosquitoes (or ticks!) that lands on the treated area.

 

Level 3: Our treatment creates a barrier around your property to keep additional mosquitoes from entering.

 

Call now for Mosquito Squad of Southern New Hampshire’s season long protection. We’ll eliminate those mosquitoes that have already made their way into your yard as well prevent other mosquitoes from entering. So when the kids are out of school and you are spending your night’s outdoors, you won’t have to worry about protecting them from those itchy bites and mosquito-borne illnesses. Our safe and effective barrier spray will eliminate what mosquitoes are present and prevent resurgence for 21 days, which is when we come back to apply another treatment. It’s triple protection all summer long.

Mosquito Squad of SONH

The team at Mosquito Squad of SoNH

Contact Mosquito Squad of Southern New Hampshire to learn more about and our safe and effective barrier spray program. Call now for a free quote • (603) 373 – 8863 • email: sonh@mosquitosquad.com and start living the mosquito free life.

 

 

 

asian-tiger-mosquito

A Mosquito is a Mosquito is a Mosquito

The Asian Tiger mosquito can be easily identified by the white and black stripes on its legs and abdomen.

The Asian Tiger mosquito can be easily identified by the white and black stripes on its legs and abdomen.

Right? Well, not really. While it’s true that all mosquito bites hurt, make us miserable, and have the potential of spreading diseases, mosquitoes themselves are actually quite different from one another if we look at them closely. Here in Southern New Hampshire, our environment actually contains 47 different species of mosquitoes, each with unique characteristics. But out of these 47, only a few are responsible for the spreading West Nile virus and Eastern Equine Encephalitis (EEE). The two biggest culprits are the Asian Tiger Mosquito (Aedes albopictus) and the Cattail Mosquito (Coquillettidia perturbans).

The Asian Tiger mosquito is a relatively recent arrival in the United States. Originally a native of tropical climates, it came to our shores in used tires that were imported from the tropics. These mosquitoes are particularly troublesome because they carry West Nile virus and, unlike many others, are active during daylight hours. Asian Tiger mosquitoes are easily identified by black and white stripes in their legs and abdomen.

While all mosquitoes love water, the Cattail mosquito is especially fond of it. In their larval form, these mosquitoes attach themselves to the roots of water plants. They are able to breath underwater, making them impossible to eliminate with larvicides (since larvicides drown mosquito eggs).  These mosquitoes are prone to transmitting EEE and can travel up to a mile at a time. They are brown or tan with darker brown stripes on their legs and abdomen.

No matter what mosquitoes are most prevalent on your property, they all have the following in common:

  • They need water to breed
  • Only the female can bite
  • Their wings beat 300 to 600 times per second
  • They can fly about 1 to 1.5 miles per hour
  • They can smell humans from 60 feet away
Mosquito Squad of SONH

The team at Mosquito Squad of SoNH

And no matter the mosquito species, Mosquito Squad of Southern New Hampshire can help you control them. We use a variety of methods to ensure that we eliminate mosquitoes no matter where they are in their lifecycle. This ensures that we are not only protecting you and your family, but we are also decreasing the mosquito population at large, which is extremely important with the arrival of spring and summer.  So don’t wait until you get bitten. Be proactive.  Give us a call today or come visit us at the NH State Home Show, booth #1202,  this weekend at the Radisson Center of Central New Hampshire to talk to us about protecting your family this season.  • (603) 373 – 8863 • email: sonh@mosquitosquad.com

As mosquitoes all around Southern New Hampshire test positive for WNV, anxiety continues to grow for residents

Blood filled female mosquito

West Nile Virus detected in Stratham, Sandown and Pelham, which has raised concern among NH residents.

As reports come in regards to mosquito-borne illness activity going on all around us, Southern New Hampshire residents are getting more anxious. The newest positive test results for West Nile Virus indicate the virus has been detected in two mosquito pools in Stratham, N.H., making it at least the third community in the state this summer where the virus has surfaced. This new location comes to us after the virus was also identifed last week in nearby Sandown, mosquito samples taken from a testing pool have tested positive for West Nile Virus. According to a report in the Eagle Tribune, the timing for this discovery couldn’t have gotten much worse. The positive test results that indicate the presence of WNV in the Sandown community came on the eve of the annual summer event “Old Home Days“, which has become a tradition in Sandown and the surrounding communities. With the festivities in town and with a lot of people being outside this past weekend. Officials said they would rather be safe than sorry and began emergency spraying for mosquitoes throughout the town prior to the event. Town officials said parts of the town are typically sprayed for mosquitoes, but the spraying is happening earlier in the year than usual, which seems to be the case all over the area as other positive test results continue to grow. Last year Sandown was the first town in the state to test positive for West Nile Virus.

WNV warning sign

In addition to utilizing a mosquito control and protection program at home, avoid areas where mosquitoes are prevalent.

The positive WNV results come in just a short time after two mosquito pools in Pelham also tested positive for the virus. Officials are quick to point out that mosquito season in New Hampshire reaches peak level around Labor Day. Mosquito activity in NH generally offers no relief until mid-October, and in keeping with years past sometimes mosquitoes will continue to be a source of concern until the arrival of the season’s first snow. With this in mind, it is important to remain vigilant in exercising safe mosquito practices at home and abroad.

In our region, human infections of mosquito-borne illnesses such as West Nile Virus and Eastern Equine Encephalitis make top news during the summer months. As of yet, there have been no reports of Eastern Equine Encephalits for this season.

It can sometimes be hard to initially identify the presence of the disease because some cases are asymptomatic, which means the individual infected may show no symptoms of being ill. Being infected with West Nile Virus can also take those infected down two very different paths, one being the development of West Nile Fever and the other turning into West Nile Disease.

asian-tiger-mosquito

The day biting Asian tiger mosquito is a known vector of West Nile Virus.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), It is estimated that about 20% of people who become infected with WNV will develop West Nile fever. Symptoms include fever, headache, tiredness, and body aches, occasionally with a skin rash (on the trunk of the body) and swollen lymph glands. While the illness can be as short as a few days, even healthy people have reported being sick for several weeks. The symptoms of severe disease (also called neuroinvasive disease, such as West Nile encephalitis or meningitis or West Nile poliomyelitis) include headache, high fever, neck stiffness, stupor, disorientation, coma, tremors, convulsions, muscle weakness, and paralysis. It is estimated that approximately 1 in 150 persons infected with the West Nile virus will develop a more severe form of disease. Serious illness can occur in people of any age; however people over age 50 and some immunocompromised persons (for example, transplant patients) are at the highest risk for getting severely ill when infected with WNV. Most people (about 4 out of 5) who are infected with West Nile virus will not develop any type of illness (an asymptomatic infection); however you cannot know ahead of time if you’ll get sick or not when infected.

Mosquito Squad mosquito free backyard

Keep your family safe from the risk of mosquito-borne illness this season!

During this most crucial time of the season, when the potential to contract a mosquito-borne illness is at its peak, it’s important for NH residents to reduce the risk of coming into contact with a mosquito altogether. The truth is you never know which mosquitoes could be carrying West Nile, and which are not. The best prevention against all mosquito related illnesses is to exercise efficient mosquito control and prevention practices. Mosquito Squad of Southern New Hampshire can eliminate and prevent the resurgence of mosquitoes on your property all season long with our barrier spray program. Our safe and effective barrier spray will eliminate what mosquitoes are present and prevent resurgence for 21 days. Getting started is easy and worry free. Our rotation program ensures mosquito control all summer long and you won’t have to play guessing games about mosquitoes any longer!

Mosquito Squad of SONH

The team at Mosquito Squad of SoNH

Contact Mosquito Squad of Southern New Hampshire to learn more about and our highly effective barrier spray program. Live mosquito free or die. Call now for a free quote • (603) 373 – 8863 • email: sonh@mosquitosquad.com and start living the

A unique case of comorbid insect-borne illness in Hillsborough County, NH has residents taking heed to the dangers of mosquito and tick borne illness

Dread Skeeter for Mosquito Squad

Mosquito Squad of Southern New Hampshire aims to keep residents informed about the risk of mosquito and tick-borne illness in the granite state.

This season will undoubtedly go down in Southern New Hampshire history as the most unusual in comparison to previous years when it comes to mosquito and tick-borne illness. A prime example of the unusual incidence of vector-borne illness reported in our region is making headlines where a  NH man has been reported to have tested positive for two insect-borne illnesses at the same time. The man has tested positive for both The Jamestown Canyon virus, which is transmitted by infected mosquitoes, and the Powassan virus, which is carried by ticks. Both illnesses have never been reported in New Hampshire. Not only is the discovery of these illnesses a first for our area, one is a tick-borne illness and one is a mosquito-borne illness. The presence of two insect-borne illnesses is what is referred to as a “comorbid” illness. Though reports of comorbid insect-borne illness is more likely to occur when a  patient is diagnosed with a tick-borne comorbid illness such as Lyme Disease and Babesiosis since both of these illnesses are carried by the same vector, being the deer tick. It is very unusual to be diagnosed with both a mosquito-borne illness and a tick-borne illness at the same time, as is the case with this man in Hillsborough County, NH. The discovery is causing concern among New Hampshire residents and proves that mosquito and tick related illness is evolving in our region and it is important to take measures to keep yourself protected to reduce your risk of infection from these tiny terrors.

Mosquito and tick together

This pair is making headlines all over New Hampshire as a rare combination of virus caused by both strikes one NH man at the same time.

This report comes at a time when mosquito and tick-borne illness activity is already gaining media attention all across the country.  Just this summer,  two newly discovered tick-borne illnesses have risen to the surface, Heartland Virus and a new illness not yet named attributed to the bacteria Borrelia miyamotoi which are making the rounds in the Northeastern U.S. These two tick-borne illnesses come in addition to a season where we are seeing positive test results earlier than usual in vector-borne illnesses we are already familiar with. Last week, the first reported case of Eastern Equine Encephalitis was confirmed in Belchertown, MA when a horse tested positive for the mosquito-borne disease and elevated the threat level for the disease to critical level in Belchertown.

We are beginning to hear and read stories of these type of occurrences all over the country but none have been quite as unique in nature as the report of the man with a double insect-borne illness right here in New Hampshire. According to WMUR 9 News of New Hampshire, the Jamestown Canyon virus have been around the United States for a while, and the Powassan virus has been found in Maine and Vermont, so the New Hampshire case is not a surprise. The Granite State resident most likely contracted Powassan Virus from the bite of an infected deer tick. Powassan Virus is rare with fewer than 60 reported cases within North America since the late 1950’s.  In regards to the presence of the Jamestown Canyon Virus, or JCV, this virus normally maintains a relationship between mosquitoes and deer, but somehow this Hillsborough County man contracted the virus. The symptoms that led to the discovery of this rare combination of comorbid vector-borne illnesses closely resemble those that are reported in patients with West Nile Virus, which can closely mimic those of the flu. Symptoms readily seen is West Nile are fever headache, body aches and fatigue.

Southern NH tick protection and control

Powassan Virus is carried by the deer tick.

What is Powassan Virus and Jamestown Canyon Virus?

Powassan virus, (POWV) is a rare tick-borne virus in North America. POWV infects the central nervous system and can cause encephalitis and meningitis. Historically, confirmed cases occurred mainly in the northeastern United States. Since 2008, confirmed cases in Minnesota and Wisconsin have increased. The CDC has also reported a fatal case of POWV encephalitis in Minnesota. POWV infection is caused by an arbovirus (similar to the mosquito-borne West Nile virus) but it is transmitted to humans by the bite of an infected tick instead of a mosquito bite. The virus is named for Powassan, Ontario where it was first discovered.

Female mosquito in SoNH full of blood

Mosquitoes are responsible for Jamestown Canyon Virus.

Jamestown Canyon Virus is a mosquito-borne pathogen that circulates widely in North America, primarily between deer and mosquitoes, according to Public health director for the New Hampshire Department of Health and Human Services, Dr. Jose Montero, most reported human illnesses, while rare, have been mild, but “moderate-to-severe central nervous system involvement has been reported.” Symptoms of Jamestown Canyon Virus also closely mimic the flu-like symptoms associated with WNV too.

Fortunately, the Hillsborough County man who was diagnosed with this unusual cocktail of mosquito and tick borne illness is expected to make a full recovery. Though this story ends on a good note, Mosquito Squad of Southern New Hampshire urges residents to take heed to the warning this story sends in regards to the risks associated with the presence of mosquitoes and ticks in your backyard. Now is the time to reduce your exposure to mosquitoes and ticks in order to reduce the risk of infection. Mosquito and tick illness is becoming more and more prevalent all over the country. If residents do not exercise safe mosquito and tick practices when venturing outdoors, including your own backyard, it becomes a question of when you or a member of your family will become infected with a vector-borne illness rather than if.

Mosquito Squad of SONH

The team at Mosquito Squad of SoNH

Contact Mosquito Squad of Southern New Hampshire to learn more about our highly effective mosquito and tick control and prevention programs that will keep you and your family protected from the risk of mosquito and tick-borne illness on the home front, and allow you the freedom to not live the rest of your summer in fear of what is lurking in your own backyard!  Live mosquito free or die. Call us today for a free quote • (603) 373 – 8863 • email: sonh@mosquitosquad.com and start living the mosquito free life.

Southern New Hampshire residents take heed; confirmed cases of WNV have already begun to show up in states closeby

Dread Skeeter for Mosquito Squad

Mosquito Squad of Southern New Hampshire aims to keep residents informed about the risk of West Nile Virus in our region.

As of yet, Southern New Hampshire has not  had a confirmed case of West Nile Virus this season. Phew! Even though when it comes to West Nile Virus, no news is good news; our neighboring states have already begun to see positive test results for WNV in mosquitoes. The states nearest to the granite state that have tested positive are Massachusetts, Connecticut, and Vermont.  With this much activity around us, now is not the time to get lazy about staying on top of your mosquito control practices.

mosquito squad mosquito

We can keep your backyard free of these this season.

New Hampshire began testing mosquitoes for West Nile in the beginning of July. The reason for this is because it usually takes a few extra weeks for New Hampshire to heat up and become an “ideal” mosquito habitat – ideal for mosquitoes that is! The warmer weather mixed with our amount of abundant rainfall make the conditions perfect for mosquito infestations. According to an article published last week by NHPR New Hampshire News, Vector Borne Disease Surveillance Coordinator Whitney Howe states “We really can’t predict the season, both in terms of mosquito populations and activity and the potential risk for disease transmission, because there are so many environmental factors involved, But certainly mosquitoes do breed most proficiently in warm, wet environments.  So right now is prime mosquito season.”

WNV warning sign

In addition to utilizing a mosquito control and protection program at home, avoid areas where mosquitoes are prevalent.

Though it is good news that NH has not had a confirmation of WNV, it is crucial to not allow the lack of disease thus far give us a false sense of security. In looking back, New Hampshire did not confirm its first human case of West Nile Virus last season until mid-August, when a resident of Manchester became infected with the disease. Up until then, there had been no confirmed human cases of WNV in New Hampshire since 2010. West Nile Virus first appeared in the NH in 2000. Since then, four other humans have contracted the mosquito-borne virus. During the 2012 mosquito season other New Hampshire communities had confirmed cases of mosquitoes testing positive for West Nile without confirmed human cases, which were Nashua, Salem, Seabrook, North Hampton and Brentwood. These positive test results indicated that the potential for infection was present, and the Granite State was fortunate in not having more residents to become infected.

Take back your outdoors with Mosquito Squad of SoNH

With Mosquito Squad of SoNH you have the freedom to enjoy the summer without the worry of mosquito-borne illness.

During this most crucial time of the season, when the potential to contract a mosquito-borne illness is at its peak, it’s important for NH residents to reduce the risk of coming into contact with a mosquito altogether. The truth is you never know which mosquitoes could be carrying West Nile, and which are not. The best prevention against all mosquito related illnesses is to exercise efficient mosquito control and prevention practices. Mosquito Squad of Southern New Hampshire can eliminate and prevent the resurgence of mosquitoes on your property all season long with our barrier spray program. Our safe and effective barrier spray will eliminate what mosquitoes are present and prevent resurgence for 21 days. Getting started is easy and worry free. Our rotation program ensures mosquito control all summer long and you won’t have to play guessing games about mosquitoes any longer!

Mosquito Squad of SONH

The team at Mosquito Squad of SoNH

Contact Mosquito Squad of Southern New Hampshire to learn more about and our safe and effective barrier spray program. Live mosquito free or die. Call now for a free quote • (603) 373 – 8863 • email: sonh@mosquitosquad.com and start living the mosquito free life.

Mosquito Squad proves that fact is stranger than fiction when dealing with the werewolf of all mosquitoes; the Asian Tiger mosquito of NH

asian-tiger-mosquito

Take the tiger by the tail with Mosquito Squad of Southern New Hampshire.

This year could quite possibly become known as the year of the mosquito because of the large and steady amount of rain much of the country has received thus far this season. When you combine the rainfall and the stagnate water it leaves behind with one of the mildest NH winters on record and the warm temperatures common this time of year, you get a recipe for disaster. Some mosquito experts are saying the Granite State is in for a challenging mosquito season due to the lack of a hard freeze which has helped mosquito species that winter under root systems thrive. Flooding from heavy rain has also created ideal breeding conditions for all species of mosquitoes. Research indicates that mosquitoes carrying a disease, such as West Nile virus, the virus can become amplified within the mosquito in warmer weather making mosquitoes like the Asian Tiger mosquito even more menacing this season.

mosquito larvae and eggs in standing water

This image show mosquito larvae and eggs present in overlooked standing rainwater.

The Asian Tiger mosquito is at the top of the list as one of the most feared mosquitoes in the NH region. All this summer rain is causing their populations to soar. This mosquito is a known carrier of West Nile Virus and is also a much more aggressive mosquito than its Culex mosquito cousins we are accustomed to. Asian Tiger mosquitoes are day feeding mosquitoes and are referred to as the “Forest Day mosquito” for this reason. While other mosquitoes are lurking in the shade waiting on night to settle to begin feeding, these mosquitoes are feeding throughout the day and in some cases swarming NH residents!  Asian Tiger mosquitoes do feed in the evening as well, but are more likely to do so during a full moon. The Asian’s aggressive demeanor, blood lust for humans, and likelihood to feed during a full moon make it one mosquito you’ll quickly want to eliminate from your yard.This video courtesy of Buzz 60 outlines the sum of all our fears when it comes to the Asian Tiger mosquito.

Where did they come from?

In 1985, the Asian Tiger Mosquito arrived in Houston, Texas inside a shipment of tires imported from Japan.  Since then, it has spread across the entire Southern US, and up the East coast to New Hampshire. The Asian Tiger mosquito has the ability to breed in miniscule amounts of water. It can perpetuate its brood in an area no larger than a discarded soda top or crevice in a tree, or even the corner of a flower pot. The Asian also lays eggs in loose or moist soil awaiting the arrival of a summer rain to activate incubation, so trying to control this mosquito can become a guessing game trying to figure out which areas will receive rain. When trying to prevent and control the presence of Asian Tiger mosquitoes around your home, it is very important to eradicate all items that could pool water. It is also important to have you property treated by a licensed mosquito professional to ensure these tough mosquitoes don’t take up residence in your backyard.

Blood filled female mosquito

Blood filled Asian Tiger mosquito- yuck!

Our program can kill and prevent mosquitoes, including the Asian tiger mosquito in and on your property all season long. Our safe and effective barrier spray will kill what mosquitoes are present and prevent resurgence for 21 days. Getting started is easy and worry free. Our rotation program ensures mosquito control all summer long.

Mosquito Squad of SONH

The team at Mosquito Squad of SoNH

Contact Mosquito Squad of Southern New Hampshire to learn more about the Asian tiger mosquito and our safe and effective barrier spray program. Live mosquito free or die. Call now (603) 373 – 8863 • email: sonh@mosquitosquad.comto start living the mosquito free life.

West Nile Virus in New Hamphire- the whole story.

Summer fun mosquito free

Summer fun should be mosquito free!

As a child, I can recall long summer days of carefree outdoor fun that spilled over into the evening hours. Getting bitten by a mosquito was always part of the equation, and so were the whelps and discomfort that followed. Not so very long ago mosquito-borne illness wasn’t a concern our parents worried much about on those fun summer evenings. The only concern of seasonal mosquitoes was the chance of infection from scratching the itchy bites too much. Things have drastically changed in a short period of time when it comes to the way we view mosquitoes.

Fast forward to the present and the many mosquito-borne illnesses we have to consider each time we venture outdoors into an unprotected area and you will realize the impetus of exercising mosquito smart practices.  One of the most prevalent causes for concern is the risk of West Nile Virus. West Nile Virus is a mosquito-borne disease that can cause a mild fever to encephalitis (swelling of the brain) or meningitis (swelling of the membranes surrounding the brain and spinal cord) in humans and other mammals. The West Nile Virus cycle is maintained in nature between mosquitoes and birds, the latter serving as reservoir hosts. The mosquito becomes infected by biting a bird that carries the virus. An infected mosquito can also spread the virus to healthy birds as well. Overwintering adult mosquitoes can harbor the virus and thereby serve as one way of sustaining the disease year to year.

mosquito squad mosquito

Last year the CDC reported a total of 5,674 cases of WNV disease in people, including 286 deaths.

West Nile was first detected in North America in 1999 in New York City.  Prior to 1999, the illness had only been found in Africa, Eastern Europe, and West Asia. When the outbreak in 1999 took place researchers initially thought it might be St. Louis Encephalitis. During the same time researchers were observing human cases, they also noted an increase in avian mortality including wild crows and exotic birds at The Bronx Zoo. This occurrence was a call to alarm, because St. Louis Encephalitis has never shown a trend in avian mortality.  Other pathogenic arboviruses were investigated as the cause of this unusual phenomenon but, subsequent DNA sequencing of human and avian viral isolates indicated that they were closely related to West Nile (WN) Virus, not previously isolated in the Western Hemisphere. This event marked the beginning of things to come in terms of WNV infection. In 2012, all 48 contiguous states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico reported WNV infections in people, birds, or mosquitoes. According to the New Hampshire Department of Health and Human Services Division of Public Health Services nationally, there has been a dramatic increase in West Nile Virus activity since 2002, including infections reported in New Hampshire.

Mosquito eggs

Reducing the risk of contracting West Nile begins with eliminating areas where mosquitoes breed and lay their eggs.

In our region, human infections of mosquito-borne illnesses such as West Nile Virus and Eastern Equine Encephalitis are as commonplace in the news during the summer months as the prediction of a summer thunderstorm. It can sometimes be hard to initially identify the presence of the disease because some cases are asymptomatic, which means the individual infected may show no symptoms of being ill. Being infected with West Nile Virus can also take those infected down two very different paths, one being the development of West Nile Fever and the other turning into West Nile Disease.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), It is estimated that about 20% of people who become infected with WNV will develop West Nile fever. Symptoms include fever, headache, tiredness, and body aches, occasionally with a skin rash (on the trunk of the body) and swollen lymph glands. While the illness can be as short as a few days, even healthy people have reported being sick for several weeks. The symptoms of severe disease (also called neuroinvasive disease, such as West Nile encephalitis or meningitis or West Nile poliomyelitis) include headache, high fever, neck stiffness, stupor, disorientation, coma, tremors, convulsions, muscle weakness, and paralysis. It is estimated that approximately 1 in 150 persons infected with the West Nile virus will develop a more severe form of disease. Serious illness can occur in people of any age; however people over age 50 and some immunocompromised persons (for example, transplant patients) are at the highest risk for getting severely ill when infected with WNV. Most people (about 4 out of 5) who are infected with West Nile virus will not develop any type of illness (an asymptomatic infection); however you cannot know ahead of time if you’ll get sick or not when infected.

Mosquitoes suck

Mosquitoes suck, and so do the diseases they carry!

The best prevention against West Nile, and other mosquito related illnesses is to exercise efficient mosquito control and prevention practices. Mosquito Squad of Southern New Hampshire can eradicate and prevent the resurgence of mosquitoes on your property all season long with our barrier spray program. Our safe and effective barrier spray will kill what mosquitoes are present and prevent resurgence for 21 days. Getting started is easy and worry free. Our rotation program ensures mosquito control all summer long.

Mosquito Squad of SONH

The team at Mosquito Squad of SoNH

Contact Mosquito Squad of Southern New Hampshire to learn more about and our safe and effective barrier spray program. Live mosquito free or die. Call now (603) 373 – 8863 • email: sonh@mosquitosquad.comto start living the mosquito free life.

Southern NH mosquito spraying has begun. Call Mosquito Squad now to keep mosquitoes out of your yard.

Mosquito on spring flowers

Mosquito on spring flowers.

There is no denying the arrival of spring here in Southern New Hampshire. Along with the pleasant outdoor temperatures, abundant blooming bulbs and plants, the mosquitoes have also arrived! Mosquitoes season in New Hampshire not only puts a damper on any outdoor activities during the season, it can also result in contracting a serious mosquito-borne illness such as West Nile Virus. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimate that nearly 300,000 Americans have been sickened with West Nile Virus since it arrived in the U.S. 11 years ago.

Mosquito Squad of SoNH Wheelbarrow troubles

Items like a forgotten wheelbarrow behind the garden shed can serve as a breeding facility for 1,000’s of mosquitoes.

Mosquitoes thrive in moist, lush surroundings and the geography of Southern New Hampshire offers everything a mosquito is looking for. The best way to reduce your chances of being terrorized in your own backyard this season is to exercise smart mosquito practices.

Southern NH mosquito control including having your yard protected with our effective barrier spray system and also taking efforts to reduce standing water in and around your yard.

Here are some tips for making your home less appetizing for mosquitoes.

Making a habit of inspecting your surroundings regularly and tipping and turning over items that can pool moisture which will prevent mosquitoes from breeding on your property. Keep in mind that an item no larger than a discarded soda pop lid can hold hundreds of mosquito eggs. We also encourage homeowners to check their gutters to make sure they are clean and free of debris. Clogged gutters permit moist leaves and debris to accumulate, as well as encouraging weed growth in the gutter itself. This combination makes the perfect recipe for a mosquito to lay her brood of eggs and increase the numbers of mosquitoes in your yard. Also avoid letting debris and brush pile up within your landscape. Keep your lawn cut at an appropriate height and keep shrubbery trimmed and groomed to discourage mosquitoes from taking up residence. Join Dread Skeeter in this catchy rap…

Mosquito Squad lets you enjoy the season mosquito free

Mosquito Squad of SoNH lets you enjoy the season mosquito free.

Southern New Hampshire offers a highly effective mosquito barrier spray treatment program that works by simple yard spraying to eliminate mosquitoes. Using a barrier treatment at home reduces the need for using DEET-containing bug spray on the body. Mosquito Squad’s eliminates 90% or more of the mosquitoes and ticks on your property. We apply our mosquito elimination spray every 21 days to all the areas of your property where pests may harbor and feed.  This EPA-registered treatment is resistant to breakdown by rain, wind and light and will reduce the mosquito population from ruining your outdoor living and putting you at risk for mosquito-borne illnesses.  Mosquito Squad of Southern New Hampshire has you covered from the first bite of the season through the end.

Mosquito Squad of SONH

The team at Mosquito Squad of SoNH

Contact Mosquito Squad of Southern New Hampshire to learn more about our safe and effective barrier spray program. Live mosquito free or die. Call now (603) 373 – 8863 • email: sonh@mosquitosquad.comto start living the mosquito free life.