Don’t Let Mosquitoes Take Advantage of Hurricane Season

Hurricane season can bring standing water that become mosquito breeding grounds.

Hurricane season can bring standing water that become mosquito breeding grounds.

With hurricane Arthur dumping massive amounts rain on our neighbors in Maine and Rhoda Island over the weekend, we are reminded that hurricane season is now upon us. Here in Southern New Hampshire, we may have dodged the severe weather that Arthur brought, but it’s only matter of time before the intense rain from another summer hurricane comes falling on our heads. Of course, we all know that summer rains are great for the garden, but they also bring mosquitoes out in droves. Why? Because mosquitoes thrive in warm, wet weather. It provides optimal conditions for their reproduction, and mosquitoes reproduce at alarming rates.

 

Female mosquitoes lay their eggs in still, standing water. In as few as seven days after eggs are laid, hundreds of tiny mosquitoes can emerge from as little as one teaspoon. The rains that hurricanes bring dump far more than a teaspoon in our lawns, and little pockets of water can be hard to detect. Water gathers in puddles, toys that have been left out, saucers underneath potted plants, buckets, wheelbarrows, and tarps that may be lying around. Even depressions in your grill cover can quickly become a mosquito nursery after an intense rainfall. Additionally, hurricane weather can increase humidity for days after it has passed, making water less likely to evaporate.

 

Let Mosquito Squad of Southern New Hampshire fight mosquitoes for you.

Let Mosquito Squad of Southern New Hampshire fight mosquitoes for you.

So as we enter hurricane season, remember to fight mosquitoes by eliminating standing water wherever you can, and be sure your property is draining. Even when you take these precautions, the middle of mosquito season is often itchy and painful. So treat your property for mosquitoes, and your family will be able to enjoy evenings outdoors, mosquito-free. At Mosquito Squad of Southern New Hampshire, we specialize in stopping mosquitoes. Our barrier sprays are highly effective at reducing the number of mosquitoes in your yard (up to 90%), and they last 21 days even if it rains. Of course, there are more than 21 days left of mosquito season, so we will set you up on a spray schedule that continue to repel mosquitoes all season.

 

Mosquito Squad of SONH

The team at Mosquito Squad of SoNH

Hurricane weather may bring more mosquitoes, but there is no need to let them ruin your summer. Don’t wait until the next hurricane creates breeding grounds and you’re getting bit. Call Mosquito Squad of Southern New Hampshire today at (603) 373 – 8863 and sign up. The sooner you call, the sooner your family can enjoy evenings in the yard without swatting, slapping, and still ending up with pain and itching.

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Chikungunya Virus Is Making News in Southern New Hampshire

Mosquitoes carry a wide range of diseases, including Chikungunya virus.

Mosquitoes carry a wide range of diseases, including Chikungunya virus.

When we think about mosquito-borne illnesses, West Nile Virus is the one that comes to mind, but unfortunately, mosquitoes are vectors for many diseases. Recently, Chikungunya virus, a flu-like disease transmitted by mosquitoes that includes rash and joint swelling, has been receiving more media attention than in the past. It even made last Saturday’s broadcast of Good Morning America. Why? Because for the first time, outbreaks are occurring very close to the United States. In previous years, few people in Southern New Hampshire would ever be exposed to Chikungunya. It was found primarily in Africa, Asia, and India, and only those traveling to such areas of the world were at risk of contracting the virus. However, in December 2013, an outbreak occurred in the Caribbean, bringing the virus very close home. While there have still been no outbreaks in the United States to date, more cases are occurring stateside because the Caribbean countries are popular travel destinations for more US citizens.

 

So what does this all mean? If your travel plans are within the United States, you probably won’t be exposed to Chikungunya virus this year. However with the disease so close by, it really is only a matter of time before the virus spreads into our country. According to the CDC, “[w]ith the recent outbreaks in the Caribbean and the Pacific, the number of chikungunya cases among travelers visiting or returning to the United States from affected areas will likely increase. These imported cases could result in local spread of the virus in the continental United States” (Source).

 

Eliminate standing water on your property to help reduce the mosquito population.

Eliminate standing water on your property to help reduce the mosquito population.

Chikungunya is just one more disease in the mosquito-borne arsenal, so it is important to minimize your exposure to mosquitoes in order to prevent these diseases. You can do this by making your property less appealing to them. Remember that mosquitoes love standing water. They need it to breed and multiply, so do not let it accumulate in your yard. Be sure to turn over any outdoor items that could collect rainwater, and if it does collect in a toy, bucket, or other item, get rid of the water as soon as possible. The longer water is undisturbed, the more likely it is to attract mosquitoes. You can also treat your property to eliminate mosquitoes and repel new ones that are searching for a home. Mosquito Squad of Southern New Hampshire specializes in ridding you of these pests. Our highly effective barrier sprays can eliminate up to 90% of the mosquitoes in your yard and are effective for up to 21 days. When clients schedule with us, we include all sprays for the season, so they have continuous control all summer long. Our pricing also includes the entire mosquito season.

 

Mosquito Squad of SONH

The team at Mosquito Squad of SoNH

Don’t let a mosquito-born illness ruin your summer, and when Chikungunya virus does finally break out in our area, be ready. Contact Mosquito Squad of Southern New Hampshire today (603) 373 – 8863 • email: sonh@mosquitosquad.com. We are in the business of protecting you and your family from the annoyance and pain of mosquito bites and from the more serious illnesses that can result.

Getting Rid of Mosquitoes in Your Southern New Hampshire Backyard

Drive mosquitoes out of your yard before they start biting.

Drive mosquitoes out of your yard before they start biting.

Last week, we told you about some characteristics that mosquitoes find very attractive so you can avoid certain behaviors and take precautions that minimize the bites you receive. While these steps help you avoid these pests, it is best to simply not have them around at all. So how do you get rid of mosquitoes in your backyard or keep them from coming to visit in the first place? In order to be effective in your efforts, it’s important to understand a little about mosquito life.

Mosquitoes don’t live very long, only about a month, but during that timeframe, they are extremely active breeders. A single female mosquito can lay over three hundred eggs during each egg-laying period, and she will have four of these periods during her short lifetime. Of these mosquito larvae, about half of them will be female, each one capable of laying just as many eggs as her mother. So in optimal conditions, your backyard can go from mosquito-free to virtually infested in very little time. If you are trying to rid yourself of mosquitoes or prevent them from calling your property home, you simply have to prevent those optimal conditions.

Mosquitoes proliferate anywhere there is stagnant water.

Mosquitoes proliferate anywhere there is stagnant water.

Water, specifically still water, is essential for mosquito breeding. Female mosquitoes lay eggs anywhere they can find stagnant water, and they don’t need much. It only takes about a teaspoon (or one bottle capful). In order to prevent or reduce mosquitoes, you need to eliminate standing water in your yard. Be sure that you turn over any buckets or kid’s toys that could collect rainwater and routinely check your property for any items that may have collected it. Pour it out if you find it. Poorly drained areas of your yard also hold enough water to allow mosquitoes to breed. Check drainage ditches, pipes, and gutters for blockages that create the opportunity for water to pool and remove any blockages.

Mosquito Squad of SONH

The team at Mosquito Squad of SoNH

While eliminating standing water will go a long way toward mosquito control, you will probably still have some of them. Treating your property will further reduce the mosquito population. Who should you call? Mosquito Squad of Southern New Hampshire. Our mosquito treatments are extremely effective and registered with the EPA. Our barrier sprays are applied to the vegetation on your property and contain a binding agent that allows them to be effective for 21 days. We also have misting systems and organic options. So call us today to learn more about these options and sign up! Nothing is more annoying than abandoning a fun evening outdoors because you’re becoming mosquito dinner. Do something about it. (603) 373 – 8863 • email: sonh@mosquitosquad.com

How to Avoid a Southern New Hampshire Mosquito

By doing these simple things, you can have a mosquito friend in no time.

By doing these simple things, you can have a mosquito friend in no time.

So you know a few people that mosquitoes just won’t leave alone at an outdoor gathering while they completely ignore you. Have you ever wondered why your friend is a magnet and you seem to be a repellant?  Mosquitoes are very selective,  know what they want and know where to find it.  Here’s what they’re looking for:

 

  1.  Type “O” Blood – While it will be hard to change your blood type, mosquitoes find those who are type “O” very, very attractive. Some scientists believe this is related to amino acid and protein levels in this type of blood.
  2. Want You to Have a Drink – Whether your preference is beer, wine, or a margarita, mosquitoes a drawn to those who have been drinking alcohol. Alcohol changes your blood chemistry, and mosquitoes just can’t get enough of it. Cheers!
  3. Persuade You to Get Sweaty – It doesn’t matter if you are working or working out; mosquitoes like sweat. For them, it works like an expensive perfume. So go for a run or mow the grass with a push mower, they won’t be able to resist you.
  4. Choose Dark Clothing – Mosquitoes really don’t care as much for pastels or whites. They’d much prefer you look dark and mysterious. Dig out that little black dress or a nice navy shirt and you’re to be a winner.
  5. Like the Pregnant One – Mosquitoes really love moms-to-be. Again, this is probably related to blood chemistry, but they find these ladies especially enticing.

 

Protect yourself and your family this mosquito season.

Protect yourself and your family this mosquito season.

Okay, we realize you aren’t really trying to attract a mosquito. You’d much prefer to drive them away. They’re pesky, painful, and carry diseases no one wants. Of course, some of the characteristics mosquitoes love cannot be helped, but knowing what mosquitoes find attractive can help you make choices accordingly. If you have type “O” blood, that’s not going to change, but your choice of drink can.

 

Mosquito Squad of SONH

The team at Mosquito Squad of SoNH

Even if you are able to avoid all of the characteristics mosquitoes love, you will still probably be bitten at some point this summer. Don’t continue to just swat at them. Do something about it. Call Mosquito Squad of Southern New Hampshire and sign up for our season long mosquito treatments. We will come out to your property and apply a barrier spray every 21 days. It will provide continuous control of mosquitoes on your property all season long. Even if you are unfortunate enough to have all of the characteristics above, you can still kick mosquitoes to the curb this season.  (603) 373 – 8863 • email: sonh@mosquitosquad.com

Be Aware! It’s Lyme Disease Awareness Month

Lyme Disease is carried by the deer tick.

Lyme Disease is carried by the deer tick.

Backed by many of the top Lyme-focused non-profit groups, May is Lyme Disease Awareness Month. It is an international initiative, and awareness events are occurring in other countries, as well as the USA. If you don’t know much about Lyme Disease, there is no better time to learn about it, especially for those of us living in Southern New Hampshire. Our state borders some of the most Lyme Disease dense states, and the number of cases reported in our state ranks within the top fifteen in the country. Because the disease is so prevalent in our area, it is important for you to know where it comes from, be able to identify its symptoms, and know how to protect yourself and your family.

 

Lyme Disease is caused by the Borrelia burgdorfer bacteria and is transmitted through the bite of the black-legged tick (commonly called the deer tick). In early stages, the symptoms of Lyme Disease mimic the flu – headache, fever, chills, muscle and joint aches, and disturbed sleep. A distinctive rash, Erythema migrans (EM) or “bull’s-eye” rash, also appears in many cases. In later stages, neurological symptoms including muscle twitches, tremors, and Bel’s palsy may present themselves. If untreated, arthritis can develop, and neurological symptoms may worsen. The disease typically responds well to antibiotic treatment.

 

The EM or "bulls eye" rash. Photo courtesy of cdc.gov.

The EM or “bulls eye” rash. Photo courtesy of cdc.gov.

As with any disease that is transmitted through an insect bite, the very best protection against Lyme Disease is to prevent being bitten by ticks. While not all ticks carry Lyme, it is impossible to know whether a tick does or not without scientific testing, so it’s best to just avoid them. Since ticks live in wooded and densely grassy areas, it is important to check for them regularly, especially after you have been traversing such an area. Tick repellents are also very effective at minimizing the number of ticks that may get on you. If you are concerned about chemicals, concentrating application on your shoes will help repel ticks living in the grass.

 

To help control ticks on your property, keep your grass cut regularly and treat your property. Mosquito Squad of Southern New Hampshire utilizes barrier sprays and tick tubes to help eliminate ticks and control the population in your yard. Our two-step method effectively eliminates up to 90% of ticks within your treated property. By reducing your exposure to ticks, you can reduce your and your family’s chances of contracting Lyme Disease. Don’t wait. Do something positive during Lyme Disease Awareness Month to prevent the disease. Help reduce the Southern New Hampshire tick population by calling us today and starting with your property.

 

Mosquito Squad of SONH

The team at Mosquito Squad of SoNH

 

Call us today for a free quote • (603) 373 – 8863 • email: sonh@mosquitosquad.com
Mosquito Squad of Southern New Hampshire

Mosquito-cast: Southern New Hampshire 2014

Well, it is officially spring, and the deeper into the season we get the more mosquitoes will begin raising their ugly heads. As you will be dealing with these pests, it is good to know what you may be up against this season. A forecast for mosquitoes might make our fight a little easier. Turns out forecasts do exist, and one based out of Cornell University, gives projections for the entire season in the New Hampshire. According to this projection, the adult mosquito population will be much higher than average this season and will peak sometime in early to mid July.

 

Mosquito eggs need water to develop.

Mosquito eggs need water to develop.

What, you might say, is the cause for such high projections for 2014? Very likely, our winter weather is to blame. We have had a lot of snow, and as the weather warms, the snow pack melts and causes wet conditions for long periods of time. It will take a while for the ground to dry out. Mosquito eggs need water in order to continue developing into larva, pupa, and subsequently adults. And while you can see mosquito eggs in puddles, they don’t really require an abundance of water to develop. Mosquito eggs can survive in piles of fallen, wet leaves and grass clippings. Where there is moisture in the spring, there are mosquito eggs.

 

Just one female mosquito can produced hundreds of females that will also reproduce.

Just one female mosquito can produced hundreds of females that will also reproduce.

So why isn’t the peak forecasted earlier in the season? Because of the way mosquitoes multiply exponentially. A single female lays up to 300 eggs during each egg laying period. She can lay eggs during each week of her 4-week lifespan. About 150 of her offspring will be female, and each of these females will lay eggs at the same rate and volume as her mother. That’s a lot of mosquitoes originating from just one, and the warmer temperatures make these offspring more likely to survive.

 

Mosquito Squad of SONH

The team at Mosquito Squad of SoNH

So what does this mean for you? Get started eliminating mosquito habitats early because there will be plenty of them. Be sure your yard is draining, and clean up piles of leaves or grass. Getting rid of suitable breeding grounds minimizes the number of eggs that will be laid on your property. Also, call Mosquito Squad of Southern New Hampshire. We treat for mosquitoes in all stages of their lives, including eggs. If we eliminate eggs during the spring, you will have fewer adult mosquitoes to contend with later in the season and can have much more enjoyable days and evenings outdoors. Call us today for a free quote • (603) 373 – 8863 • email: sonh@mosquitosquad.com

Where Do Ticks and Mosquitoes Go for the Winter?

So it’s no secret that those of us who reside in the northern portions of the US love to go south for a break during the winter. If you’re retired, this break is probably a bit more of an extended stay, but even those of us who are in the flourish of our careers love a journey to a warmer climate. And who can blame us? Winters here are harsh. Birds do it; we should get to do it too. Recently, I returned from a rejuvenating trip to sunny Florida. And since I’m thinking of my favorite way to escape winter, I thought you might be interested in knowing how ticks and mosquitoes escape. Obviously, they don’t get away like birds and people, and knowing how and where they spend the winter helps Mosquito Squad of Southern New Hampshire address your tick and mosquito problems in the spring, summer, and fall.

Mosquito Squad of SONH reminds you that all sizes of tick carry disease

All sizes of ticks can carry and spread Lyme disease.

Let’s begin with ticks. The most worrisome variety here in the area is the blacklegged tick (commonly called the deer tick). It is the foremost carrier of Lyme disease, transmits a host of other tick-bourne illnesses, and lives up to two years. The University of Rhode Island supports a large tick research and education program sponsored by the US Department of Agriculture and many health care groups. According to their research, ticks survive winter weather in much the same fashion as bears. They hibernate or become dormant. But they only do this when the ground is frozen; any other time, they are active. Ticks are very resilient creatures and capable of surviving harsh conditions in piles of fallen leaves and fallen, rotting logs.

Mosquitoes – those painful summertime nuisances and carriers of a swath of diseases including West Nile virus – are famous for how quickly they reproduce. Unlike the tick, the lifespan of a mosquito is relatively short, about a month. But they do survive winter, or we would never have to worry about them again. The Center for Vector Biology at Rutgers University maintains that

Mosquito eggs

Reducing the risk of contracting West Nile begins with eliminating areas where mosquitoes breed and lay their eggs.

many mosquitoes become dormant, like ticks, by entering hollow logs, animal burrows, or basements. Some mosquitoes that cannot survive by hibernation lay winter-hardy eggs, which hatch in the spring when temperatures rise in to the 60s, and some mosquitoes hibernate during their larval stage in the mud of swamps and ponds in order to survive the freeze.

So what does this mean for us? Remember that during the winter you can still combat the tick and mosquito populations by getting rid of fallen leaves and keeping the land around your home as dry as possible. Of course now that the weather is warming, it is time to begin planning for spring and summer tick and mosquito control. So call Mosquito Squad of Southern New Hampshire today. We will work with you to set up a control plan that will help protect you, your family, and your pets all summer long.

Mosquito Squad of SONH

The team at Mosquito Squad of SoNH

Call us today for a free quote • (603) 373 – 8863 • email: sonh@mosquitosquad.com

Don’t let the mosquitoes catch you this 4th of July. Catch them before they catch you!

enjoy the 4th of july holiday mosquito free with Mosquito Squad of SoNH

Don’t let mosquitoes ruin your 4th of July outdoor celebration.

The Fourth of July holiday is best spent outdoors. This particular holiday involves the outdoors more than any other special occasion we observe. Backyard barbecues, pool parties and enjoying s’mores and firecrackers (sparklers for the kids), are just a few of the many outdoor activities we will enjoy for the 4th.  As part of planning for the festivities, you probably have food, paper goods and decorations on your to-do list, but have you thought about the mosquito control?

Mosquito control should be at the top of every homeowners list when planning for the 4th of July holiday. It is quite easy to run out to the store to pick up more BBQ sauce if you run out while the celebration is going on, but realizing you forget to take care of the mosquitoes in the middle of the festivities is an entirely different scenario. Many great outdoor celebrations have been forced indoors or have ended abruptly because of the wrath of the backyard mosquito. Nowadays, you even have to protect yourself from mosquitoes that feed during the day, as well as the ones that bite from dusk until dawn.

asian-tiger-mosquito

Take the tiger by the tail with Mosquito Squad of Southern New Hampshire.

The Asian tiger mosquito is a day feeding mosquito and is sure to wreak havoc on your outdoor celebration unless you take preventative measures. This mosquito does not play by the same rules as other mosquitoes and will strike anytime, anywhere and packs a bite that is much more painful than that of the average backyard mosquito. Asian tiger mosquitoes have even been known to swarm their hosts when feeding mimicking the behavior of a wasp or bee. These menaces are also very good at spreading a number of viral pathogens including St. Louis Encephalitis and West Nile Virus.

Mosquitoes suck

Mosquitoes suck, and so do the diseases they carry!

It is an American tradition to retreat to our backyards in honor of this occasion. It is a time spent with friends, family and neighbors to celebrate freedom, Americana and the highlight of the outdoor living season. Mosquito Squad of Southern New Hampshire will allow you the freedom to enjoy your outdoors during your special 4th of July celebration and beyond.

Our safe and effective barrier spray eliminates and prevents mosquitoes from trying to get in on the fun. Our service takes care of both day and evening feeding mosquitoes, so you and your guests remain safe with an invisible veil of protection. We are still accepting appointments to spray your yard in time for your July 4th event.

Mosquito Squad of SONH

The team at Mosquito Squad of SoNH

Contact Mosquito Squad of Southern New Hampshire to schedule your backyard mosquito control for the upcoming Fourth of July holiday, don’t get caught without it! Call us today for a free quote • (603) 373 – 8863 • email: sonh@mosquitosquad.com

Mosquito Squad of Southern New Hampshire helps get you acquainted with the Asian tiger mosquito with the top 5 things you need to know about this species

asian-tiger-mosquito

Take the tiger by the tail with Mosquito Squad of Southern New Hampshire.

The Asian tiger mosquito (Aedes albopictus) is an invasive mosquito species that is known to be a vector of a wide range of mosquito-borne illness and disease. The Asian tiger is also a potential vector for Yellow Fever and has now been identified as the main carrier of Chikungunya Fever, a debilitating joint disease prevalent in Asia. Here in the United States the Asian is to blame for the spread of Lacrosse Encephalitis and Canine heartworms.

Mosquito Squad mosquito free backyard

Keep your family and pets safe from the wrath of mosquitoes this season.

This mosquito is native to the tropical and subtropical regions of Southeast Asia. In 1985, the first sightings of the Asian tiger mosquito within the US were documented in a used tire yard in Houston, TX. The mosquito is believed to have hitched a ride to the United States inside a shipment of used tires from Asia. Only two years after the arrival of this unwanted world traveler, the population had already spread into 17 states. Currently the Asian tiger mosquito’s realm extends from Texas all along the Southern coast all the way to the Atlantic. This mosquito has been identified in 25 states. The mosquitoes identified range is documented as far North as Iowa. Stringent regulations have been implemented to try and cease the problem of more of these mosquitoes being brought into the US.  The used tire trade is still the primary way these mosquitoes continue to enter our country.

Mosquito Squad of Southern New Hampshire

Our barrier spray program kills and prevents mosquitoes during the whole season.

The  Asian tiger mosquito was named for its distinct black and white markings which resemble its namesake – the tiger. This mosquito was aptly named because it exhibits much of the same aggression at dinner time as that of the big cat. This mosquito displays a more hostile feeding habit than other mosquito. The mosquito congregates and has been reported to swarm homeowners in their own backyard similar to a bee.  The Asian is relentless and will return to feed after being swatted away. One distinctive trait of this mosquito is that it feeds during the day. The unique feeding habits of this mosquito is why some refer to it as the Forest day mosquito. When other mosquitoes are in there “down” time waiting for the sun to fade into the horizon, this mosquito is active. Mosquito Squad of Southern New Hampshire has compiled a list of the five things you need to know about the Asian tiger mosquito. Our main goal is to keep you informed of the type of mosquito you are dealing with.

Top 5 things your need to know about the Asian tiger mosquito

#1) Asian tiger mosquitoes are aggressive day feeders.

#2) Asian tiger mosquitoes can breed in minimal amount of water including small puddles, crevices and knots in trees, planter reservoirs and even bottle caps.

#3) A brood of Asian tiger mosquitoes can hatch in as little as a few days.

#4) An adult Asian tiger mosquito can live up to 6 months. During her lifetime a female Asian tiger mosquito can lay over 2,000. This combination is a recipe for disaster, you do the math.

#5) You can kill and prevent Asian tiger mosquitoes in your backyard by using the proven Mosquito Squad of Southern New Hampshire mosquito barrier spray program.

Mosquito free life

Our program can kill and prevent mosquitoes, including the Asian tiger mosquito in and on your property all season long. Our safe and effective barrier spray will kill what mosquitoes (and ticks) are present and prevent resurgence for 21 days. Getting started is easy and worry free. Our rotation program ensures mosquito control all summer long.

Contact Mosquito Squad of Southern New Hampshire to learn more about the Asian tiger mosquito and our safe and effective barrier spray program. Live mosquito free or die. Call now (603) 373 – 8863 • email: sonh@mosquitosquad.comto start living the mosquito free life.