New Hampshire Resident Contracts Eastern Equine Encephalitis

Mosquitoes transmit Eastern Equine Encephalitis to humans.

Mosquitoes transmit Eastern Equine Encephalitis to humans.

Several times this season, Mosquito Squad of Central New Hampshire has cautioned you about mosquito borne diseases. Though we all know they exist, sometimes it is easy to go through life as if they don’t, simply because most of us have never been directly affected by them. But this week, Eastern Equine Encephalitis (EEE) strikes close to home, and this time, the disease has not been identified in mosquitoes or horses but rather one of our neighbors. On Friday, the Concord Monitor reported that a Conway resident has been diagnosed with EEE.

 

Eastern Equine Encephalitis is a serious disease that can affect birds, horses, and humans. It is serious, and there is no treatment other than palliative care while the disease runs its course. There is also no vaccine for humans. EEE is transmitted to birds, horses, and humans though the bite of an infected mosquito. It will not pass from birds or horses to humans, and horses can’t get it from bird or other horses. Mosquitoes are the culprit here. Early human symptoms include many flu-like symptoms: chills, fever, joint pain, muscle pain, and feeling “out of sorts”. Encephalitic infections in humans are the most severe manifestation of the disease. They include: headache, irritability, restlessness, drowsiness, anorexia, vomiting, diarrhea, cyanosis, convulsions, and coma. Typically, an EEE infection will require hospitalization for recovery.

 

It's more important than ever to to control the mosquito population on your property.

It’s more important than ever to to control the mosquito population on your property.

Be sure that you and your family avoid Eastern Equine Encephalitis this season since it is in our local mosquito population. The very best protection from the virus is to avoid being bitten by the mosquitoes that may carry it. EEE is transmitted by several different species of mosquitoes, so the best defense is to control all mosquitoes. On your property, be sure that you are eliminating any areas of standing water – even if it is just a little water. Mosquitoes can use as little as a teaspoon for a breeding ground. Check the screens on your windows and doors. As temperatures cool, you will probably be using the AC unit less, so be sure mosquitoes can’t find their way into your home. When you venture outdoors, use a mosquito repellent, especially during the morning and evening hours when more mosquitoes are active. But do remember that certain species are active during all hours of the day. Long sleeved shirts and long pants can also make it more difficult for mosquitoes to bite you.

 

Finally, be sure to maximize your mosquito control by calling Mosquito Squad of Southern New Hampshire. Our mosquito treatments will effectively eliminate up to 90% of the mosquitoes on your property. They are long lasting, up to 21 days even when it rains. We will even set up a treatment schedule, so you don’t have to worry about mosquitoes for the rest of the season. EEE is serious. Be sure that you and your family are protected. Contact Mosquito Squad of Southern New Hampshire today to get the best mosquito control available.

Mosquito Squad of SONH

The team at Mosquito Squad of SoNH

 

 

 

Mosquito Squad of Southern New Hampshire
(603) 373 – 8863

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How to Protect Your Southern New Hampshire Horses (and Yourself) from Eastern Equine Encephalitis

Protect your horses from Easter Equine Encephalitis

Protect your horses from Easter Equine Encephalitis

Eastern Equine Encephalitis (EEE) made its way into New Hampshire last week. According to The Eagle Tribune, the State Health Department has found the virus in a batch of mosquitoes in Londonderry (Source). Now that infected mosquitoes have been identified in our area, it is important for horse owners to take precautionary steps that help reduce their horses’ risk of contracting the disease. Though no infected horses have been identified in New Hampshire to date, simple prevention of the disease is best because most horses that contract EEE do not survive.

 

Symptoms of EEE in horses include erratic behavior, head pressing, unsteadiness, and a loss of coordination. Any horse showing these symptoms should be examined by a veterinarian immediately. While it will not help a horse that is already infected, an equine vaccination exists for Eastern Equine Encephalitis. Fortunately, this vaccine can help prevent horses from getting the disease in the first place. If you own a horse, please discuss the vaccine with your veterinarian. While some owners perform routine vaccinations for their own horses, experts within the Entomology Department at Rutgers University advise against this for this vaccine. The EEE vaccine must be administered according to a specific protocol in order to be effective, and if that protocol is not followed, the horse may not be as protected though the owner thinks it is. (Source).

 

Eliminate standing water to help control the mosquito population.

Eliminate standing water to help control the mosquito population.

In addition to the vaccine, horse owners can help reduce risk by controlling the mosquito population on their property and around their stables. EEE is spread to horses through the bite of a mosquito. The disease is not communicable between horses, and horses cannot pass the disease to humans. Like horses, humans become infected by being bitten by an infected mosquito. Unfortunately, an infected horse indicates that the disease is present in the local mosquito population, and there is no way of knowing which mosquitoes are infected without testing. As you can see, the best way to control the disease is to control the mosquitoes that spread it.

 

In addition to eliminating stagnant water that can easily accumulate in many areas around a stable, owners should treat their property for mosquitoes to have the most effective control. Here at Mosquito Squad of Southern New Hampshire, we are mosquito elimination experts. Our barrier sprays and misting systems can reduce your mosquito population by up to 90%. This means there are far fewer mosquitoes present that could bite your horse or a family member. Protect those you love, both four-legged and two-legged, from EEE by calling us today to talk about your options. You’ll be one step closer to managing the mosquitoes on your property.

Mosquito Squad of SONH

The team at Mosquito Squad of SoNH

 

 

 

Mosquito Squad of Southern New Hampshire
(603) 373 – 8863

First Locally Transmitted Chikungunya Cases Identified in United States Last Week

The Asian Tiger is one of the mosquitoes that spreads Chikungunya virus.

The Asian Tiger is one of the mosquitoes that spreads Chikungunya virus.

Just last week, we posted about Chikungunya virus coming to New Hampshire through infected travelers. It would appear our post was right on time. Last week, on July 17th, the Florida Department of Health announced that state’s first confirmed cases of locally transmitted Chikungunya virus. This means that the persons who contracted the disease had not recently traveled outside of the country. The CDC announced this information that same day. As experts have predicted, Chikungunya virus is now in the continental United States. A mosquito-borne illness, the disease is transmitted by the Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus mosquitoes, and the Asian tiger mosquito (Aedes albopictus) resides in Southern New Hampshire.

 

While Chikungunya virus is still many miles away, it is important to know its symptoms, so it can be correctly identified. Symptoms typically present themselves 3-7 days after a person is bitten, and the most common are fever and joint pain. Other symptoms include headache, muscle pain, joint swelling, and rash. Very young children, the elderly, and individuals suffering from other health conditions are most at risk of developing severe manifestations of the disease. Fortunately, death from Chikungunya virus is rare, but the disease is painful and debilitating. Blood tests are used to diagnose Chikungunya. While there is no cure, the disease typically runs its course in one week, though some continue to experience joint pain for longer periods of time. Treatment includes rest, plenty of fluids, and over the counter pain medication to manage joint pain.

 

keep calm and call the squadOf course, no one wants to get sick. To prevent colds, we wash our hands often and stay away from those who are infected. Chikungunya is not transmitted through person-to-person contact. Being bitten by an infected mosquito is the only way to contract the virus, so let’s all avoid mosquito bites. Wear light colored clothing when outdoors and use a mosquito repellent. To reduce the mosquito population on your property, rid the area of standing water – dump it out when you see it and be sure your property is draining.

 

Mosquito Squad of SONH

The team at Mosquito Squad of SoNH

And finally, contact Mosquito Squad of Southern New Hampshire at (603) 373 – 8863. We are mosquito-elimination experts, and our approach to mosquito control is strategic and effective. You can expect to see up to a 90% reduction in the mosquito population once we have visited. Our sprays are registered with the EPA and handled by trained professionals. Let us help keep your family safe from all mosquito-borne diseases, including the recently arrived Chikungunya virus.

Chikungunya Virus Is Making News in Southern New Hampshire

Mosquitoes carry a wide range of diseases, including Chikungunya virus.

Mosquitoes carry a wide range of diseases, including Chikungunya virus.

When we think about mosquito-borne illnesses, West Nile Virus is the one that comes to mind, but unfortunately, mosquitoes are vectors for many diseases. Recently, Chikungunya virus, a flu-like disease transmitted by mosquitoes that includes rash and joint swelling, has been receiving more media attention than in the past. It even made last Saturday’s broadcast of Good Morning America. Why? Because for the first time, outbreaks are occurring very close to the United States. In previous years, few people in Southern New Hampshire would ever be exposed to Chikungunya. It was found primarily in Africa, Asia, and India, and only those traveling to such areas of the world were at risk of contracting the virus. However, in December 2013, an outbreak occurred in the Caribbean, bringing the virus very close home. While there have still been no outbreaks in the United States to date, more cases are occurring stateside because the Caribbean countries are popular travel destinations for more US citizens.

 

So what does this all mean? If your travel plans are within the United States, you probably won’t be exposed to Chikungunya virus this year. However with the disease so close by, it really is only a matter of time before the virus spreads into our country. According to the CDC, “[w]ith the recent outbreaks in the Caribbean and the Pacific, the number of chikungunya cases among travelers visiting or returning to the United States from affected areas will likely increase. These imported cases could result in local spread of the virus in the continental United States” (Source).

 

Eliminate standing water on your property to help reduce the mosquito population.

Eliminate standing water on your property to help reduce the mosquito population.

Chikungunya is just one more disease in the mosquito-borne arsenal, so it is important to minimize your exposure to mosquitoes in order to prevent these diseases. You can do this by making your property less appealing to them. Remember that mosquitoes love standing water. They need it to breed and multiply, so do not let it accumulate in your yard. Be sure to turn over any outdoor items that could collect rainwater, and if it does collect in a toy, bucket, or other item, get rid of the water as soon as possible. The longer water is undisturbed, the more likely it is to attract mosquitoes. You can also treat your property to eliminate mosquitoes and repel new ones that are searching for a home. Mosquito Squad of Southern New Hampshire specializes in ridding you of these pests. Our highly effective barrier sprays can eliminate up to 90% of the mosquitoes in your yard and are effective for up to 21 days. When clients schedule with us, we include all sprays for the season, so they have continuous control all summer long. Our pricing also includes the entire mosquito season.

 

Mosquito Squad of SONH

The team at Mosquito Squad of SoNH

Don’t let a mosquito-born illness ruin your summer, and when Chikungunya virus does finally break out in our area, be ready. Contact Mosquito Squad of Southern New Hampshire today (603) 373 – 8863 • email: sonh@mosquitosquad.com. We are in the business of protecting you and your family from the annoyance and pain of mosquito bites and from the more serious illnesses that can result.

Getting Rid of Mosquitoes in Your Southern New Hampshire Backyard

Drive mosquitoes out of your yard before they start biting.

Drive mosquitoes out of your yard before they start biting.

Last week, we told you about some characteristics that mosquitoes find very attractive so you can avoid certain behaviors and take precautions that minimize the bites you receive. While these steps help you avoid these pests, it is best to simply not have them around at all. So how do you get rid of mosquitoes in your backyard or keep them from coming to visit in the first place? In order to be effective in your efforts, it’s important to understand a little about mosquito life.

Mosquitoes don’t live very long, only about a month, but during that timeframe, they are extremely active breeders. A single female mosquito can lay over three hundred eggs during each egg-laying period, and she will have four of these periods during her short lifetime. Of these mosquito larvae, about half of them will be female, each one capable of laying just as many eggs as her mother. So in optimal conditions, your backyard can go from mosquito-free to virtually infested in very little time. If you are trying to rid yourself of mosquitoes or prevent them from calling your property home, you simply have to prevent those optimal conditions.

Mosquitoes proliferate anywhere there is stagnant water.

Mosquitoes proliferate anywhere there is stagnant water.

Water, specifically still water, is essential for mosquito breeding. Female mosquitoes lay eggs anywhere they can find stagnant water, and they don’t need much. It only takes about a teaspoon (or one bottle capful). In order to prevent or reduce mosquitoes, you need to eliminate standing water in your yard. Be sure that you turn over any buckets or kid’s toys that could collect rainwater and routinely check your property for any items that may have collected it. Pour it out if you find it. Poorly drained areas of your yard also hold enough water to allow mosquitoes to breed. Check drainage ditches, pipes, and gutters for blockages that create the opportunity for water to pool and remove any blockages.

Mosquito Squad of SONH

The team at Mosquito Squad of SoNH

While eliminating standing water will go a long way toward mosquito control, you will probably still have some of them. Treating your property will further reduce the mosquito population. Who should you call? Mosquito Squad of Southern New Hampshire. Our mosquito treatments are extremely effective and registered with the EPA. Our barrier sprays are applied to the vegetation on your property and contain a binding agent that allows them to be effective for 21 days. We also have misting systems and organic options. So call us today to learn more about these options and sign up! Nothing is more annoying than abandoning a fun evening outdoors because you’re becoming mosquito dinner. Do something about it. (603) 373 – 8863 • email: sonh@mosquitosquad.com

How to Avoid a Southern New Hampshire Mosquito

By doing these simple things, you can have a mosquito friend in no time.

By doing these simple things, you can have a mosquito friend in no time.

So you know a few people that mosquitoes just won’t leave alone at an outdoor gathering while they completely ignore you. Have you ever wondered why your friend is a magnet and you seem to be a repellant?  Mosquitoes are very selective,  know what they want and know where to find it.  Here’s what they’re looking for:

 

  1.  Type “O” Blood – While it will be hard to change your blood type, mosquitoes find those who are type “O” very, very attractive. Some scientists believe this is related to amino acid and protein levels in this type of blood.
  2. Want You to Have a Drink – Whether your preference is beer, wine, or a margarita, mosquitoes a drawn to those who have been drinking alcohol. Alcohol changes your blood chemistry, and mosquitoes just can’t get enough of it. Cheers!
  3. Persuade You to Get Sweaty – It doesn’t matter if you are working or working out; mosquitoes like sweat. For them, it works like an expensive perfume. So go for a run or mow the grass with a push mower, they won’t be able to resist you.
  4. Choose Dark Clothing – Mosquitoes really don’t care as much for pastels or whites. They’d much prefer you look dark and mysterious. Dig out that little black dress or a nice navy shirt and you’re to be a winner.
  5. Like the Pregnant One – Mosquitoes really love moms-to-be. Again, this is probably related to blood chemistry, but they find these ladies especially enticing.

 

Protect yourself and your family this mosquito season.

Protect yourself and your family this mosquito season.

Okay, we realize you aren’t really trying to attract a mosquito. You’d much prefer to drive them away. They’re pesky, painful, and carry diseases no one wants. Of course, some of the characteristics mosquitoes love cannot be helped, but knowing what mosquitoes find attractive can help you make choices accordingly. If you have type “O” blood, that’s not going to change, but your choice of drink can.

 

Mosquito Squad of SONH

The team at Mosquito Squad of SoNH

Even if you are able to avoid all of the characteristics mosquitoes love, you will still probably be bitten at some point this summer. Don’t continue to just swat at them. Do something about it. Call Mosquito Squad of Southern New Hampshire and sign up for our season long mosquito treatments. We will come out to your property and apply a barrier spray every 21 days. It will provide continuous control of mosquitoes on your property all season long. Even if you are unfortunate enough to have all of the characteristics above, you can still kick mosquitoes to the curb this season.  (603) 373 – 8863 • email: sonh@mosquitosquad.com

Mosquito-cast: Southern New Hampshire 2014

Well, it is officially spring, and the deeper into the season we get the more mosquitoes will begin raising their ugly heads. As you will be dealing with these pests, it is good to know what you may be up against this season. A forecast for mosquitoes might make our fight a little easier. Turns out forecasts do exist, and one based out of Cornell University, gives projections for the entire season in the New Hampshire. According to this projection, the adult mosquito population will be much higher than average this season and will peak sometime in early to mid July.

 

Mosquito eggs need water to develop.

Mosquito eggs need water to develop.

What, you might say, is the cause for such high projections for 2014? Very likely, our winter weather is to blame. We have had a lot of snow, and as the weather warms, the snow pack melts and causes wet conditions for long periods of time. It will take a while for the ground to dry out. Mosquito eggs need water in order to continue developing into larva, pupa, and subsequently adults. And while you can see mosquito eggs in puddles, they don’t really require an abundance of water to develop. Mosquito eggs can survive in piles of fallen, wet leaves and grass clippings. Where there is moisture in the spring, there are mosquito eggs.

 

Just one female mosquito can produced hundreds of females that will also reproduce.

Just one female mosquito can produced hundreds of females that will also reproduce.

So why isn’t the peak forecasted earlier in the season? Because of the way mosquitoes multiply exponentially. A single female lays up to 300 eggs during each egg laying period. She can lay eggs during each week of her 4-week lifespan. About 150 of her offspring will be female, and each of these females will lay eggs at the same rate and volume as her mother. That’s a lot of mosquitoes originating from just one, and the warmer temperatures make these offspring more likely to survive.

 

Mosquito Squad of SONH

The team at Mosquito Squad of SoNH

So what does this mean for you? Get started eliminating mosquito habitats early because there will be plenty of them. Be sure your yard is draining, and clean up piles of leaves or grass. Getting rid of suitable breeding grounds minimizes the number of eggs that will be laid on your property. Also, call Mosquito Squad of Southern New Hampshire. We treat for mosquitoes in all stages of their lives, including eggs. If we eliminate eggs during the spring, you will have fewer adult mosquitoes to contend with later in the season and can have much more enjoyable days and evenings outdoors. Call us today for a free quote • (603) 373 – 8863 • email: sonh@mosquitosquad.com

asian-tiger-mosquito

A Mosquito is a Mosquito is a Mosquito

The Asian Tiger mosquito can be easily identified by the white and black stripes on its legs and abdomen.

The Asian Tiger mosquito can be easily identified by the white and black stripes on its legs and abdomen.

Right? Well, not really. While it’s true that all mosquito bites hurt, make us miserable, and have the potential of spreading diseases, mosquitoes themselves are actually quite different from one another if we look at them closely. Here in Southern New Hampshire, our environment actually contains 47 different species of mosquitoes, each with unique characteristics. But out of these 47, only a few are responsible for the spreading West Nile virus and Eastern Equine Encephalitis (EEE). The two biggest culprits are the Asian Tiger Mosquito (Aedes albopictus) and the Cattail Mosquito (Coquillettidia perturbans).

The Asian Tiger mosquito is a relatively recent arrival in the United States. Originally a native of tropical climates, it came to our shores in used tires that were imported from the tropics. These mosquitoes are particularly troublesome because they carry West Nile virus and, unlike many others, are active during daylight hours. Asian Tiger mosquitoes are easily identified by black and white stripes in their legs and abdomen.

While all mosquitoes love water, the Cattail mosquito is especially fond of it. In their larval form, these mosquitoes attach themselves to the roots of water plants. They are able to breath underwater, making them impossible to eliminate with larvicides (since larvicides drown mosquito eggs).  These mosquitoes are prone to transmitting EEE and can travel up to a mile at a time. They are brown or tan with darker brown stripes on their legs and abdomen.

No matter what mosquitoes are most prevalent on your property, they all have the following in common:

  • They need water to breed
  • Only the female can bite
  • Their wings beat 300 to 600 times per second
  • They can fly about 1 to 1.5 miles per hour
  • They can smell humans from 60 feet away
Mosquito Squad of SONH

The team at Mosquito Squad of SoNH

And no matter the mosquito species, Mosquito Squad of Southern New Hampshire can help you control them. We use a variety of methods to ensure that we eliminate mosquitoes no matter where they are in their lifecycle. This ensures that we are not only protecting you and your family, but we are also decreasing the mosquito population at large, which is extremely important with the arrival of spring and summer.  So don’t wait until you get bitten. Be proactive.  Give us a call today or come visit us at the NH State Home Show, booth #1202,  this weekend at the Radisson Center of Central New Hampshire to talk to us about protecting your family this season.  • (603) 373 – 8863 • email: sonh@mosquitosquad.com

Where Do Ticks and Mosquitoes Go for the Winter?

So it’s no secret that those of us who reside in the northern portions of the US love to go south for a break during the winter. If you’re retired, this break is probably a bit more of an extended stay, but even those of us who are in the flourish of our careers love a journey to a warmer climate. And who can blame us? Winters here are harsh. Birds do it; we should get to do it too. Recently, I returned from a rejuvenating trip to sunny Florida. And since I’m thinking of my favorite way to escape winter, I thought you might be interested in knowing how ticks and mosquitoes escape. Obviously, they don’t get away like birds and people, and knowing how and where they spend the winter helps Mosquito Squad of Southern New Hampshire address your tick and mosquito problems in the spring, summer, and fall.

Mosquito Squad of SONH reminds you that all sizes of tick carry disease

All sizes of ticks can carry and spread Lyme disease.

Let’s begin with ticks. The most worrisome variety here in the area is the blacklegged tick (commonly called the deer tick). It is the foremost carrier of Lyme disease, transmits a host of other tick-bourne illnesses, and lives up to two years. The University of Rhode Island supports a large tick research and education program sponsored by the US Department of Agriculture and many health care groups. According to their research, ticks survive winter weather in much the same fashion as bears. They hibernate or become dormant. But they only do this when the ground is frozen; any other time, they are active. Ticks are very resilient creatures and capable of surviving harsh conditions in piles of fallen leaves and fallen, rotting logs.

Mosquitoes – those painful summertime nuisances and carriers of a swath of diseases including West Nile virus – are famous for how quickly they reproduce. Unlike the tick, the lifespan of a mosquito is relatively short, about a month. But they do survive winter, or we would never have to worry about them again. The Center for Vector Biology at Rutgers University maintains that

Mosquito eggs

Reducing the risk of contracting West Nile begins with eliminating areas where mosquitoes breed and lay their eggs.

many mosquitoes become dormant, like ticks, by entering hollow logs, animal burrows, or basements. Some mosquitoes that cannot survive by hibernation lay winter-hardy eggs, which hatch in the spring when temperatures rise in to the 60s, and some mosquitoes hibernate during their larval stage in the mud of swamps and ponds in order to survive the freeze.

So what does this mean for us? Remember that during the winter you can still combat the tick and mosquito populations by getting rid of fallen leaves and keeping the land around your home as dry as possible. Of course now that the weather is warming, it is time to begin planning for spring and summer tick and mosquito control. So call Mosquito Squad of Southern New Hampshire today. We will work with you to set up a control plan that will help protect you, your family, and your pets all summer long.

Mosquito Squad of SONH

The team at Mosquito Squad of SoNH

Call us today for a free quote • (603) 373 – 8863 • email: sonh@mosquitosquad.com

West Nile Virus in New Hamphire- the whole story.

Summer fun mosquito free

Summer fun should be mosquito free!

As a child, I can recall long summer days of carefree outdoor fun that spilled over into the evening hours. Getting bitten by a mosquito was always part of the equation, and so were the whelps and discomfort that followed. Not so very long ago mosquito-borne illness wasn’t a concern our parents worried much about on those fun summer evenings. The only concern of seasonal mosquitoes was the chance of infection from scratching the itchy bites too much. Things have drastically changed in a short period of time when it comes to the way we view mosquitoes.

Fast forward to the present and the many mosquito-borne illnesses we have to consider each time we venture outdoors into an unprotected area and you will realize the impetus of exercising mosquito smart practices.  One of the most prevalent causes for concern is the risk of West Nile Virus. West Nile Virus is a mosquito-borne disease that can cause a mild fever to encephalitis (swelling of the brain) or meningitis (swelling of the membranes surrounding the brain and spinal cord) in humans and other mammals. The West Nile Virus cycle is maintained in nature between mosquitoes and birds, the latter serving as reservoir hosts. The mosquito becomes infected by biting a bird that carries the virus. An infected mosquito can also spread the virus to healthy birds as well. Overwintering adult mosquitoes can harbor the virus and thereby serve as one way of sustaining the disease year to year.

mosquito squad mosquito

Last year the CDC reported a total of 5,674 cases of WNV disease in people, including 286 deaths.

West Nile was first detected in North America in 1999 in New York City.  Prior to 1999, the illness had only been found in Africa, Eastern Europe, and West Asia. When the outbreak in 1999 took place researchers initially thought it might be St. Louis Encephalitis. During the same time researchers were observing human cases, they also noted an increase in avian mortality including wild crows and exotic birds at The Bronx Zoo. This occurrence was a call to alarm, because St. Louis Encephalitis has never shown a trend in avian mortality.  Other pathogenic arboviruses were investigated as the cause of this unusual phenomenon but, subsequent DNA sequencing of human and avian viral isolates indicated that they were closely related to West Nile (WN) Virus, not previously isolated in the Western Hemisphere. This event marked the beginning of things to come in terms of WNV infection. In 2012, all 48 contiguous states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico reported WNV infections in people, birds, or mosquitoes. According to the New Hampshire Department of Health and Human Services Division of Public Health Services nationally, there has been a dramatic increase in West Nile Virus activity since 2002, including infections reported in New Hampshire.

Mosquito eggs

Reducing the risk of contracting West Nile begins with eliminating areas where mosquitoes breed and lay their eggs.

In our region, human infections of mosquito-borne illnesses such as West Nile Virus and Eastern Equine Encephalitis are as commonplace in the news during the summer months as the prediction of a summer thunderstorm. It can sometimes be hard to initially identify the presence of the disease because some cases are asymptomatic, which means the individual infected may show no symptoms of being ill. Being infected with West Nile Virus can also take those infected down two very different paths, one being the development of West Nile Fever and the other turning into West Nile Disease.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), It is estimated that about 20% of people who become infected with WNV will develop West Nile fever. Symptoms include fever, headache, tiredness, and body aches, occasionally with a skin rash (on the trunk of the body) and swollen lymph glands. While the illness can be as short as a few days, even healthy people have reported being sick for several weeks. The symptoms of severe disease (also called neuroinvasive disease, such as West Nile encephalitis or meningitis or West Nile poliomyelitis) include headache, high fever, neck stiffness, stupor, disorientation, coma, tremors, convulsions, muscle weakness, and paralysis. It is estimated that approximately 1 in 150 persons infected with the West Nile virus will develop a more severe form of disease. Serious illness can occur in people of any age; however people over age 50 and some immunocompromised persons (for example, transplant patients) are at the highest risk for getting severely ill when infected with WNV. Most people (about 4 out of 5) who are infected with West Nile virus will not develop any type of illness (an asymptomatic infection); however you cannot know ahead of time if you’ll get sick or not when infected.

Mosquitoes suck

Mosquitoes suck, and so do the diseases they carry!

The best prevention against West Nile, and other mosquito related illnesses is to exercise efficient mosquito control and prevention practices. Mosquito Squad of Southern New Hampshire can eradicate and prevent the resurgence of mosquitoes on your property all season long with our barrier spray program. Our safe and effective barrier spray will kill what mosquitoes are present and prevent resurgence for 21 days. Getting started is easy and worry free. Our rotation program ensures mosquito control all summer long.

Mosquito Squad of SONH

The team at Mosquito Squad of SoNH

Contact Mosquito Squad of Southern New Hampshire to learn more about and our safe and effective barrier spray program. Live mosquito free or die. Call now (603) 373 – 8863 • email: sonh@mosquitosquad.comto start living the mosquito free life.