First Locally Transmitted Chikungunya Cases Identified in United States Last Week

The Asian Tiger is one of the mosquitoes that spreads Chikungunya virus.

The Asian Tiger is one of the mosquitoes that spreads Chikungunya virus.

Just last week, we posted about Chikungunya virus coming to New Hampshire through infected travelers. It would appear our post was right on time. Last week, on July 17th, the Florida Department of Health announced that state’s first confirmed cases of locally transmitted Chikungunya virus. This means that the persons who contracted the disease had not recently traveled outside of the country. The CDC announced this information that same day. As experts have predicted, Chikungunya virus is now in the continental United States. A mosquito-borne illness, the disease is transmitted by the Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus mosquitoes, and the Asian tiger mosquito (Aedes albopictus) resides in Southern New Hampshire.

 

While Chikungunya virus is still many miles away, it is important to know its symptoms, so it can be correctly identified. Symptoms typically present themselves 3-7 days after a person is bitten, and the most common are fever and joint pain. Other symptoms include headache, muscle pain, joint swelling, and rash. Very young children, the elderly, and individuals suffering from other health conditions are most at risk of developing severe manifestations of the disease. Fortunately, death from Chikungunya virus is rare, but the disease is painful and debilitating. Blood tests are used to diagnose Chikungunya. While there is no cure, the disease typically runs its course in one week, though some continue to experience joint pain for longer periods of time. Treatment includes rest, plenty of fluids, and over the counter pain medication to manage joint pain.

 

keep calm and call the squadOf course, no one wants to get sick. To prevent colds, we wash our hands often and stay away from those who are infected. Chikungunya is not transmitted through person-to-person contact. Being bitten by an infected mosquito is the only way to contract the virus, so let’s all avoid mosquito bites. Wear light colored clothing when outdoors and use a mosquito repellent. To reduce the mosquito population on your property, rid the area of standing water – dump it out when you see it and be sure your property is draining.

 

Mosquito Squad of SONH

The team at Mosquito Squad of SoNH

And finally, contact Mosquito Squad of Southern New Hampshire at (603) 373 – 8863. We are mosquito-elimination experts, and our approach to mosquito control is strategic and effective. You can expect to see up to a 90% reduction in the mosquito population once we have visited. Our sprays are registered with the EPA and handled by trained professionals. Let us help keep your family safe from all mosquito-borne diseases, including the recently arrived Chikungunya virus.

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asian-tiger-mosquito

A Mosquito is a Mosquito is a Mosquito

The Asian Tiger mosquito can be easily identified by the white and black stripes on its legs and abdomen.

The Asian Tiger mosquito can be easily identified by the white and black stripes on its legs and abdomen.

Right? Well, not really. While it’s true that all mosquito bites hurt, make us miserable, and have the potential of spreading diseases, mosquitoes themselves are actually quite different from one another if we look at them closely. Here in Southern New Hampshire, our environment actually contains 47 different species of mosquitoes, each with unique characteristics. But out of these 47, only a few are responsible for the spreading West Nile virus and Eastern Equine Encephalitis (EEE). The two biggest culprits are the Asian Tiger Mosquito (Aedes albopictus) and the Cattail Mosquito (Coquillettidia perturbans).

The Asian Tiger mosquito is a relatively recent arrival in the United States. Originally a native of tropical climates, it came to our shores in used tires that were imported from the tropics. These mosquitoes are particularly troublesome because they carry West Nile virus and, unlike many others, are active during daylight hours. Asian Tiger mosquitoes are easily identified by black and white stripes in their legs and abdomen.

While all mosquitoes love water, the Cattail mosquito is especially fond of it. In their larval form, these mosquitoes attach themselves to the roots of water plants. They are able to breath underwater, making them impossible to eliminate with larvicides (since larvicides drown mosquito eggs).  These mosquitoes are prone to transmitting EEE and can travel up to a mile at a time. They are brown or tan with darker brown stripes on their legs and abdomen.

No matter what mosquitoes are most prevalent on your property, they all have the following in common:

  • They need water to breed
  • Only the female can bite
  • Their wings beat 300 to 600 times per second
  • They can fly about 1 to 1.5 miles per hour
  • They can smell humans from 60 feet away
Mosquito Squad of SONH

The team at Mosquito Squad of SoNH

And no matter the mosquito species, Mosquito Squad of Southern New Hampshire can help you control them. We use a variety of methods to ensure that we eliminate mosquitoes no matter where they are in their lifecycle. This ensures that we are not only protecting you and your family, but we are also decreasing the mosquito population at large, which is extremely important with the arrival of spring and summer.  So don’t wait until you get bitten. Be proactive.  Give us a call today or come visit us at the NH State Home Show, booth #1202,  this weekend at the Radisson Center of Central New Hampshire to talk to us about protecting your family this season.  • (603) 373 – 8863 • email: sonh@mosquitosquad.com

Mosquito Squad proves that fact is stranger than fiction when dealing with the werewolf of all mosquitoes; the Asian Tiger mosquito of NH

asian-tiger-mosquito

Take the tiger by the tail with Mosquito Squad of Southern New Hampshire.

This year could quite possibly become known as the year of the mosquito because of the large and steady amount of rain much of the country has received thus far this season. When you combine the rainfall and the stagnate water it leaves behind with one of the mildest NH winters on record and the warm temperatures common this time of year, you get a recipe for disaster. Some mosquito experts are saying the Granite State is in for a challenging mosquito season due to the lack of a hard freeze which has helped mosquito species that winter under root systems thrive. Flooding from heavy rain has also created ideal breeding conditions for all species of mosquitoes. Research indicates that mosquitoes carrying a disease, such as West Nile virus, the virus can become amplified within the mosquito in warmer weather making mosquitoes like the Asian Tiger mosquito even more menacing this season.

mosquito larvae and eggs in standing water

This image show mosquito larvae and eggs present in overlooked standing rainwater.

The Asian Tiger mosquito is at the top of the list as one of the most feared mosquitoes in the NH region. All this summer rain is causing their populations to soar. This mosquito is a known carrier of West Nile Virus and is also a much more aggressive mosquito than its Culex mosquito cousins we are accustomed to. Asian Tiger mosquitoes are day feeding mosquitoes and are referred to as the “Forest Day mosquito” for this reason. While other mosquitoes are lurking in the shade waiting on night to settle to begin feeding, these mosquitoes are feeding throughout the day and in some cases swarming NH residents!  Asian Tiger mosquitoes do feed in the evening as well, but are more likely to do so during a full moon. The Asian’s aggressive demeanor, blood lust for humans, and likelihood to feed during a full moon make it one mosquito you’ll quickly want to eliminate from your yard.This video courtesy of Buzz 60 outlines the sum of all our fears when it comes to the Asian Tiger mosquito.

Where did they come from?

In 1985, the Asian Tiger Mosquito arrived in Houston, Texas inside a shipment of tires imported from Japan.  Since then, it has spread across the entire Southern US, and up the East coast to New Hampshire. The Asian Tiger mosquito has the ability to breed in miniscule amounts of water. It can perpetuate its brood in an area no larger than a discarded soda top or crevice in a tree, or even the corner of a flower pot. The Asian also lays eggs in loose or moist soil awaiting the arrival of a summer rain to activate incubation, so trying to control this mosquito can become a guessing game trying to figure out which areas will receive rain. When trying to prevent and control the presence of Asian Tiger mosquitoes around your home, it is very important to eradicate all items that could pool water. It is also important to have you property treated by a licensed mosquito professional to ensure these tough mosquitoes don’t take up residence in your backyard.

Blood filled female mosquito

Blood filled Asian Tiger mosquito- yuck!

Our program can kill and prevent mosquitoes, including the Asian tiger mosquito in and on your property all season long. Our safe and effective barrier spray will kill what mosquitoes are present and prevent resurgence for 21 days. Getting started is easy and worry free. Our rotation program ensures mosquito control all summer long.

Mosquito Squad of SONH

The team at Mosquito Squad of SoNH

Contact Mosquito Squad of Southern New Hampshire to learn more about the Asian tiger mosquito and our safe and effective barrier spray program. Live mosquito free or die. Call now (603) 373 – 8863 • email: sonh@mosquitosquad.comto start living the mosquito free life.

Don’t let the mosquitoes catch you this 4th of July. Catch them before they catch you!

enjoy the 4th of july holiday mosquito free with Mosquito Squad of SoNH

Don’t let mosquitoes ruin your 4th of July outdoor celebration.

The Fourth of July holiday is best spent outdoors. This particular holiday involves the outdoors more than any other special occasion we observe. Backyard barbecues, pool parties and enjoying s’mores and firecrackers (sparklers for the kids), are just a few of the many outdoor activities we will enjoy for the 4th.  As part of planning for the festivities, you probably have food, paper goods and decorations on your to-do list, but have you thought about the mosquito control?

Mosquito control should be at the top of every homeowners list when planning for the 4th of July holiday. It is quite easy to run out to the store to pick up more BBQ sauce if you run out while the celebration is going on, but realizing you forget to take care of the mosquitoes in the middle of the festivities is an entirely different scenario. Many great outdoor celebrations have been forced indoors or have ended abruptly because of the wrath of the backyard mosquito. Nowadays, you even have to protect yourself from mosquitoes that feed during the day, as well as the ones that bite from dusk until dawn.

asian-tiger-mosquito

Take the tiger by the tail with Mosquito Squad of Southern New Hampshire.

The Asian tiger mosquito is a day feeding mosquito and is sure to wreak havoc on your outdoor celebration unless you take preventative measures. This mosquito does not play by the same rules as other mosquitoes and will strike anytime, anywhere and packs a bite that is much more painful than that of the average backyard mosquito. Asian tiger mosquitoes have even been known to swarm their hosts when feeding mimicking the behavior of a wasp or bee. These menaces are also very good at spreading a number of viral pathogens including St. Louis Encephalitis and West Nile Virus.

Mosquitoes suck

Mosquitoes suck, and so do the diseases they carry!

It is an American tradition to retreat to our backyards in honor of this occasion. It is a time spent with friends, family and neighbors to celebrate freedom, Americana and the highlight of the outdoor living season. Mosquito Squad of Southern New Hampshire will allow you the freedom to enjoy your outdoors during your special 4th of July celebration and beyond.

Our safe and effective barrier spray eliminates and prevents mosquitoes from trying to get in on the fun. Our service takes care of both day and evening feeding mosquitoes, so you and your guests remain safe with an invisible veil of protection. We are still accepting appointments to spray your yard in time for your July 4th event.

Mosquito Squad of SONH

The team at Mosquito Squad of SoNH

Contact Mosquito Squad of Southern New Hampshire to schedule your backyard mosquito control for the upcoming Fourth of July holiday, don’t get caught without it! Call us today for a free quote • (603) 373 – 8863 • email: sonh@mosquitosquad.com

Mosquito Squad of SoNH discusses the mosquitoes quest for the blood meal

Female mosquito in SoNH full of blood

A female mosquito obtaining a blood meal – yuck!

There are many things about mosquitoes that cause people to shudder. At the top of the list is a mosquito and the thought of them obtaining a blood meal. The blood meal in itself is archaic, and almost vampiric in nature closely resembling an act that is only carried out in horror movies.  Believe it or not, the mosquito’s quest for blood doesn’t involve obtaining sustenance. Mosquitoes mean nothing personal when they take your blood. Female mosquitoes need protein for their eggs, and must take a blood meal in order to reproduce. Since males don’t bear the burden of producing young, they will avoid you completely and head for the flowers instead. And when not trying to produce eggs, females are happy to stick to nectar, too.

Since the females are the blood thirsty of the sexes when it comes to mosquitoes, this means that they are solely responsible for the transmission of mosquito-borne illness and disease as well. This is the main reason the mosquito is known as the deadliest creature on earth despite its small stature.

Mosquito on spring flowers

This mosquito is feeding from plant matter and nectar.

A female mosquito takes in about 5-millionths of a liter of blood in a single meal. During the mosquito’s short lifetime, she may take three or four blood meals. If she becomes infected with a mosquito-borne illness as a result of her first blood, or second meal she will retain the ability to pass the illness on through remaining feedings. For example, if a female mosquito obtains her first blood meal from a bird that is carrying the bacteria that causes West Nile Virus, that same mosquito will be able to pass West Nile on to hosts through subsequent feedings. Mosquitoes typically live about two weeks, although some adult mosquitoes can survive the winter in a type of hibernating state known as diapause. This enables them to survive for up to 8 months. During the mosquito’s lifetime, she has the capability to spread illness and disease onto 3 or 4 people, like a game of Russian roulette with wings.

When a female mosquito bites you, she injects a small amount of saliva to create a numbing effect allowing her to feed on your blood undetected. The actual bite itself doesn’t cause the redness and itching associated with a mosquito bite. The saliva that the female mosquito leaves behind actually causes an allergic reaction that creates redness, swelling and itching. A complicated set of tools make up the mosquito’s mouth parts. First the female mosquito uses her proboscis which is a slender tubular feeding and sucking structure, to perforate your skin. The proboscis consists of six different shafts. Four are cutting and piercing tools; a fifth transports blood from host to mosquito; the sixth transports saliva, which acts as an anticoagulant to keep the blood running smoothly while taking a blood meal. The mosquito’s saliva is also the method for transmitting disease onto us.

Proboscis of mosquito evident in this photo

Proboscis of mosquito evident in this photo.

Most mosquito species will feed at dusk and dawn. Generally mosquitoes do not like direct sunlight but if you are in cool, wooded, shady areas you could get mosquito bites at any time throughout the day. Also, Asian Tiger Mosquitoes are an exception to this feeding schedule. Asian Tiger Mosquitoes are aggressive day biters that will feed in direct sunlight throughout all hours of the day.

There is a remedy to the squeamish thought of a mosquito taking your blood without a formal invitation, let Mosquito Squad of Southern New Hampshire keep your yard mosquito-free all season. Our safe and effective barrier spray will kill what mosquitoes (and ticks) are present and prevent resurgence for 21 days. Getting started is easy and worry free. Our rotation program ensures mosquito control all summer long.

Mosquito Squad of SONH

The team at Mosquito Squad of SoNH

Contact Mosquito Squad of Southern New Hampshire to learn more about our safe and effective barrier spray program. Live mosquito free or die. Call now (603) 373 – 8863 • email: sonh@mosquitosquad.comto start living the mosquito free life.

Mosquito Squad of Southern New Hampshire helps get you acquainted with the Asian tiger mosquito with the top 5 things you need to know about this species

asian-tiger-mosquito

Take the tiger by the tail with Mosquito Squad of Southern New Hampshire.

The Asian tiger mosquito (Aedes albopictus) is an invasive mosquito species that is known to be a vector of a wide range of mosquito-borne illness and disease. The Asian tiger is also a potential vector for Yellow Fever and has now been identified as the main carrier of Chikungunya Fever, a debilitating joint disease prevalent in Asia. Here in the United States the Asian is to blame for the spread of Lacrosse Encephalitis and Canine heartworms.

Mosquito Squad mosquito free backyard

Keep your family and pets safe from the wrath of mosquitoes this season.

This mosquito is native to the tropical and subtropical regions of Southeast Asia. In 1985, the first sightings of the Asian tiger mosquito within the US were documented in a used tire yard in Houston, TX. The mosquito is believed to have hitched a ride to the United States inside a shipment of used tires from Asia. Only two years after the arrival of this unwanted world traveler, the population had already spread into 17 states. Currently the Asian tiger mosquito’s realm extends from Texas all along the Southern coast all the way to the Atlantic. This mosquito has been identified in 25 states. The mosquitoes identified range is documented as far North as Iowa. Stringent regulations have been implemented to try and cease the problem of more of these mosquitoes being brought into the US.  The used tire trade is still the primary way these mosquitoes continue to enter our country.

Mosquito Squad of Southern New Hampshire

Our barrier spray program kills and prevents mosquitoes during the whole season.

The  Asian tiger mosquito was named for its distinct black and white markings which resemble its namesake – the tiger. This mosquito was aptly named because it exhibits much of the same aggression at dinner time as that of the big cat. This mosquito displays a more hostile feeding habit than other mosquito. The mosquito congregates and has been reported to swarm homeowners in their own backyard similar to a bee.  The Asian is relentless and will return to feed after being swatted away. One distinctive trait of this mosquito is that it feeds during the day. The unique feeding habits of this mosquito is why some refer to it as the Forest day mosquito. When other mosquitoes are in there “down” time waiting for the sun to fade into the horizon, this mosquito is active. Mosquito Squad of Southern New Hampshire has compiled a list of the five things you need to know about the Asian tiger mosquito. Our main goal is to keep you informed of the type of mosquito you are dealing with.

Top 5 things your need to know about the Asian tiger mosquito

#1) Asian tiger mosquitoes are aggressive day feeders.

#2) Asian tiger mosquitoes can breed in minimal amount of water including small puddles, crevices and knots in trees, planter reservoirs and even bottle caps.

#3) A brood of Asian tiger mosquitoes can hatch in as little as a few days.

#4) An adult Asian tiger mosquito can live up to 6 months. During her lifetime a female Asian tiger mosquito can lay over 2,000. This combination is a recipe for disaster, you do the math.

#5) You can kill and prevent Asian tiger mosquitoes in your backyard by using the proven Mosquito Squad of Southern New Hampshire mosquito barrier spray program.

Mosquito free life

Our program can kill and prevent mosquitoes, including the Asian tiger mosquito in and on your property all season long. Our safe and effective barrier spray will kill what mosquitoes (and ticks) are present and prevent resurgence for 21 days. Getting started is easy and worry free. Our rotation program ensures mosquito control all summer long.

Contact Mosquito Squad of Southern New Hampshire to learn more about the Asian tiger mosquito and our safe and effective barrier spray program. Live mosquito free or die. Call now (603) 373 – 8863 • email: sonh@mosquitosquad.comto start living the mosquito free life.