Lyme Disease Impacts Southern New Hampshire Pets Too

Last week, we talked about Lyme Disease because May is Lyme Disease Awareness month. That article focused on Lyme Disease in people, but humans aren’t the only ones who can contract Lyme Disease. Pets can too, and this fact is making news in our area. Parade Magazine recently ran an article indicating that pets in the Northeastern USA, which of course includes southern New Hampshire, are more at risk of becoming ill with Lyme. Why? The population of black-legged ticks (or deer tick as it is commonly called) is larger in the Northeast than in many other regions of the county, and these ticks are the primary carriers of Lyme. In our area, your pets could be exposed to Lyme Disease if they are bitten by a tick, and dogs are more prone to tick bites and subsequent infection than cats.

 

Lyme Disease can affect your pets too.

Lyme Disease can affect your pets too.

Lyme Disease symptoms in dogs are not the same as they are in humans. Dogs do not develop the EM or “bulls eye” rash that is so indicative of the disease. Rather, they often go lame suddenly; experience extreme pain; have swollen, feverish joints; are lethargic; and lose their appetite. The disease is serious though, like humans, pets can recover after antibiotic treatment. A dog’s risk of contracting Lyme Disease increases the longer a tick is attached. So what can you do to help prevent exposure?

 

First, you should check your dog routinely for ticks; daily is best. A black-legged tick in the nymph stage is extremely small (the size of a comma in newsprint), so great care should be taken. If you find any attached ticks, remove them immediately using tweezers and a firm, steady pull. Jerking the tick could cause mouthparts to break off, which can also increase your dog’s risk. There are also many tick prevention products available for pets than can help repel ticks, so talk to your veterinarian about which may be best for your dog or cat.

 

Evidence that the treated cotton in our tick traps is being used as nesting material.

Evidence that the treated cotton in our tick traps is being used as nesting material.

Finally, be sure to treat your yard for ticks. Most of your pet’s outdoor time will probably be in your own yard. Making that area as tick-free as possible will reduce your pet’s exposure. Mosquito Squad of Southern New Hampshire uses a two-step method for eliminating ticks. First, we apply a barrier spray that will kill the ticks currently in your yard. Second, we utilize “tick-tubes”. Tick tubes contain fibrous, tick-killing material rodents like to use in their nests. Ticks proliferate using rodents as hosts, so rodent nests are typically infested with ticks. By utilizing this material, we are able to target ticks in the areas they frequent. Through these two methods, the tick population on your property can be noticeably reduced, and you can get started with our introductory pricing, only a $99 investment.

 

Don’t take chances with your family’s health – the human part of your family or the four-legged part. Contact Mosquito Squad of Southern New Hampshire today and let us be part of Lyme Disease prevention at your home. We want to keep your dogs happy, healthy, and wagging too.

 

Mosquito Squad of SONH

The team at Mosquito Squad of SoNH

 

 

Call us today for a free quote • (603) 373 – 8863 • email: sonh@mosquitosquad.com
Mosquito Squad of Southern New Hampshire

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Ticks are Here in Southern New Hampshire

They’re here. Not the supernatural forces from Poltergeist but tiny ticks that have already been spotted in Southern New Hampshire. Despite our not so pleasant weather later, ticks have already started to emerge around our area, which means new cases of Lyme Disease will soon be coming as well. The state of New Hampshire estimates that 60% of the deer ticks here are infected with Lyme Disease and there are additional tick-borne diseases out there as well.

Mosquito Squad of SoNH tiick control

Ticks have arrived in Southern New Hampshire

What you are most likely seeing are the young, nymph ticks that are more active from early spring to late summer. These nymph ticks are also the ones most likely to spread disease and they can be very small and difficult to see. Mosquito Squad of Southern New Hampshire offers some tips, called the 6 C’s, on how to protect your family from the Southern New Hampshire ticks and the diseases they can spread.

1. Clear – Clear out the areas where ticks thrive: moist, shady areas like dead tree limbs and compost piles.

2. Clean– Keep your yard clean, your lawn cut short and the perimeter free of overgrowth. This will prevent ticks from finding places to hide.

3. Check their hiding places – Ticks likes to hide while waiting for their next blood meal to come along. Check your fences, rocky area and retaining walls. They also like wet areas like creek beds and ponds.

4. Choose plants – There are a variety of plants that deter deer, the favored host of ticks. Using these plants in your yard will keep deer and the ticks hitching a ride from entering your yard.

Protecting your pets from ticks is important.

Protecting your pets from ticks is important.

5. Care for family pets – Your pets are just as likely to get a tick bite in your yard and can suffer from Lyme Diseases as well. Make sure you check your pets carefully and frequently and stay up to date with their flea and tick control from your veterinarian.

6. Call the Pros – To eliminate up to 90% of ticks in your yard, call Mosquito Squad of Southern New Hampshire. Our proven 2-step tick control and prevention service utilizes a 21-day barrier sprays to eliminate ticks on the vegetation in your yard and tick tubes that target the younger nymph ticks residing in rodents dens.

If you do find a tick on yourself, family member or your pets, proper removal is important. While there are many techniques and tools out there, the Center for Disease Control suggests using a regular pair of tweezers to grasp the tick as close to the skin as possible and steadily pull upward. Avoid any twisting motion that could leave the mouth of the tick in tact. Follow up by cleaning the area with soap and water or rubbing alcohol.

Now is the time to call Mosquito Squad of Southern New Hampshire. The trees in our area are just starting to bud and will quickly become favored areas for the ticks we have already seen. Having our barrier spray and tick tubes protecting

Mosquito Squad of SONH

The team at Mosquito Squad of SoNH

your yard is most effective when we start early to prevent ticks from entering in the first place. Mosquito Squad of Southern New Hampshire is ready to stop ticks in their tracks with our proven dual protection tick control and prevention treatment.

 

Call us today for a free quote • (603) 373 – 8863 • email: sonh@mosquitosquad.com
Mosquito Squad of Southern New Hampshire

 

Just in case your worst bug nightmare becomes a reality, Mosquito Squad of SoNH teaches you how to properly kill a tick

This lady is screaming with the thought of having to kill a tick she just found attached to her fancy french poodle!

This lady is screaming with the thought of having to remove and kill a tick she just found attached to her fancy french poodle!

We have covered the importance of  properly removing a tick to reduce the risk of disease and bacteria transmission in previous posts. The question is, once you remove the tick properly what do you do with it? It is highly recommended to keep the tick in a container for a period of time following removal in case you start to show signs of being ill from the bite. The tick may be needed for further testing to help diagnose a possible tick-borne illness. An empty pill bottle or plastic baggie stored in a cool, dry place will do. In many circumstances ticks are still alive following removal. So the question is… what is the proper way to kill a tick?

How to kill a tick

I recently found a tick attached to my dog and realized that even though I deal with ticks on a daily basis with Mosquito Squad of SoNH, when it came to removing the tick I was suddenly all thumbs.

Can you imagine having to kill this?

Can you imagine having to kill this?

The best way to kill a tick and keep it intact enough for testing is by applying rubbing alcohol to a cotton ball and placing it within the container or baggie with the tick. The tick will die within minutes, and will remain intact. Many sources also point out that mouthwash such as Listerine will also work to kill a tick if you do not have rubbing alcohol on hand. A tick should never be handled with bare fingers, to prevent picking up the germs it might carry. Dropping it into rubbing alcohol or a mouthwash like Listerine that contains alcohol should kill it quickly.

It is not advisable to kill a tick by squashing it. Squashing a tick will kill it but will also expose the blood contained by the tick, plus it is just downright gross!  The blood may contain diseases that can be spread by contact. Any surface that comes in contact with the blood may also be contaminated. If a tick is accidentally ruptured during removal from a host, the blood should be immediately wiped up and the area washed thoroughly.keep calm and call the squad

Over the years there have been a myriad of suggestions in regards to killing a tick. Some of these include burning the tick and even microwaving the tick in a plastic bag (can you say baked tick with extra butter and sour cream)?

Of course, the old fashioned way usually entails flushing the tick down the toilet, therein lies the basis of popular folklore which says the tick will proceed to crawl back up through the plumbing. As strange as this seems, according to the Tick Encounter Resource Center at the University of Rhode Island ticks cannot swim, but can be submerged in water for 2-3 days and seem to survive just fine. Since they cannot swim, wrapping them in a tissue and flushing them down the toilet should suffice.

Ticks don't swim from the Tick Encounter Resource Center

According to the Tick Encounter Resource Center at the University of RI – ticks cannot swim!

The ideal way to eliminate a tick is to do so before it has a chance to attach to you, a member of your family or your pet. Mosquito Squad of Southern New Hampshire can reduce the chances of coming into contact with a tick while in your yard so you will never have to worry about removing ticks. When it comes to controlling and preventing ticks in your yard, out of sight is out of mind. Contact Mosquito Squad of SoNH today to learn more about our highly effective and safe tick control program. Call us today for a free quote • (603) 373 – 8863 • email: sonh@mosquitosquad.com

Mosquito Squad of SONH

The team at Mosquito Squad of SoNH

Please visit our tick identification page to help identify a tick you may come into contact with while venturing into untreated areas this season.