New Hampshire Resident Contracts Eastern Equine Encephalitis

Mosquitoes transmit Eastern Equine Encephalitis to humans.

Mosquitoes transmit Eastern Equine Encephalitis to humans.

Several times this season, Mosquito Squad of Central New Hampshire has cautioned you about mosquito borne diseases. Though we all know they exist, sometimes it is easy to go through life as if they don’t, simply because most of us have never been directly affected by them. But this week, Eastern Equine Encephalitis (EEE) strikes close to home, and this time, the disease has not been identified in mosquitoes or horses but rather one of our neighbors. On Friday, the Concord Monitor reported that a Conway resident has been diagnosed with EEE.

 

Eastern Equine Encephalitis is a serious disease that can affect birds, horses, and humans. It is serious, and there is no treatment other than palliative care while the disease runs its course. There is also no vaccine for humans. EEE is transmitted to birds, horses, and humans though the bite of an infected mosquito. It will not pass from birds or horses to humans, and horses can’t get it from bird or other horses. Mosquitoes are the culprit here. Early human symptoms include many flu-like symptoms: chills, fever, joint pain, muscle pain, and feeling “out of sorts”. Encephalitic infections in humans are the most severe manifestation of the disease. They include: headache, irritability, restlessness, drowsiness, anorexia, vomiting, diarrhea, cyanosis, convulsions, and coma. Typically, an EEE infection will require hospitalization for recovery.

 

It's more important than ever to to control the mosquito population on your property.

It’s more important than ever to to control the mosquito population on your property.

Be sure that you and your family avoid Eastern Equine Encephalitis this season since it is in our local mosquito population. The very best protection from the virus is to avoid being bitten by the mosquitoes that may carry it. EEE is transmitted by several different species of mosquitoes, so the best defense is to control all mosquitoes. On your property, be sure that you are eliminating any areas of standing water – even if it is just a little water. Mosquitoes can use as little as a teaspoon for a breeding ground. Check the screens on your windows and doors. As temperatures cool, you will probably be using the AC unit less, so be sure mosquitoes can’t find their way into your home. When you venture outdoors, use a mosquito repellent, especially during the morning and evening hours when more mosquitoes are active. But do remember that certain species are active during all hours of the day. Long sleeved shirts and long pants can also make it more difficult for mosquitoes to bite you.

 

Finally, be sure to maximize your mosquito control by calling Mosquito Squad of Southern New Hampshire. Our mosquito treatments will effectively eliminate up to 90% of the mosquitoes on your property. They are long lasting, up to 21 days even when it rains. We will even set up a treatment schedule, so you don’t have to worry about mosquitoes for the rest of the season. EEE is serious. Be sure that you and your family are protected. Contact Mosquito Squad of Southern New Hampshire today to get the best mosquito control available.

Mosquito Squad of SONH

The team at Mosquito Squad of SoNH

 

 

 

Mosquito Squad of Southern New Hampshire
(603) 373 – 8863

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How to Protect Your Southern New Hampshire Horses (and Yourself) from Eastern Equine Encephalitis

Protect your horses from Easter Equine Encephalitis

Protect your horses from Easter Equine Encephalitis

Eastern Equine Encephalitis (EEE) made its way into New Hampshire last week. According to The Eagle Tribune, the State Health Department has found the virus in a batch of mosquitoes in Londonderry (Source). Now that infected mosquitoes have been identified in our area, it is important for horse owners to take precautionary steps that help reduce their horses’ risk of contracting the disease. Though no infected horses have been identified in New Hampshire to date, simple prevention of the disease is best because most horses that contract EEE do not survive.

 

Symptoms of EEE in horses include erratic behavior, head pressing, unsteadiness, and a loss of coordination. Any horse showing these symptoms should be examined by a veterinarian immediately. While it will not help a horse that is already infected, an equine vaccination exists for Eastern Equine Encephalitis. Fortunately, this vaccine can help prevent horses from getting the disease in the first place. If you own a horse, please discuss the vaccine with your veterinarian. While some owners perform routine vaccinations for their own horses, experts within the Entomology Department at Rutgers University advise against this for this vaccine. The EEE vaccine must be administered according to a specific protocol in order to be effective, and if that protocol is not followed, the horse may not be as protected though the owner thinks it is. (Source).

 

Eliminate standing water to help control the mosquito population.

Eliminate standing water to help control the mosquito population.

In addition to the vaccine, horse owners can help reduce risk by controlling the mosquito population on their property and around their stables. EEE is spread to horses through the bite of a mosquito. The disease is not communicable between horses, and horses cannot pass the disease to humans. Like horses, humans become infected by being bitten by an infected mosquito. Unfortunately, an infected horse indicates that the disease is present in the local mosquito population, and there is no way of knowing which mosquitoes are infected without testing. As you can see, the best way to control the disease is to control the mosquitoes that spread it.

 

In addition to eliminating stagnant water that can easily accumulate in many areas around a stable, owners should treat their property for mosquitoes to have the most effective control. Here at Mosquito Squad of Southern New Hampshire, we are mosquito elimination experts. Our barrier sprays and misting systems can reduce your mosquito population by up to 90%. This means there are far fewer mosquitoes present that could bite your horse or a family member. Protect those you love, both four-legged and two-legged, from EEE by calling us today to talk about your options. You’ll be one step closer to managing the mosquitoes on your property.

Mosquito Squad of SONH

The team at Mosquito Squad of SoNH

 

 

 

Mosquito Squad of Southern New Hampshire
(603) 373 – 8863

asian-tiger-mosquito

A Mosquito is a Mosquito is a Mosquito

The Asian Tiger mosquito can be easily identified by the white and black stripes on its legs and abdomen.

The Asian Tiger mosquito can be easily identified by the white and black stripes on its legs and abdomen.

Right? Well, not really. While it’s true that all mosquito bites hurt, make us miserable, and have the potential of spreading diseases, mosquitoes themselves are actually quite different from one another if we look at them closely. Here in Southern New Hampshire, our environment actually contains 47 different species of mosquitoes, each with unique characteristics. But out of these 47, only a few are responsible for the spreading West Nile virus and Eastern Equine Encephalitis (EEE). The two biggest culprits are the Asian Tiger Mosquito (Aedes albopictus) and the Cattail Mosquito (Coquillettidia perturbans).

The Asian Tiger mosquito is a relatively recent arrival in the United States. Originally a native of tropical climates, it came to our shores in used tires that were imported from the tropics. These mosquitoes are particularly troublesome because they carry West Nile virus and, unlike many others, are active during daylight hours. Asian Tiger mosquitoes are easily identified by black and white stripes in their legs and abdomen.

While all mosquitoes love water, the Cattail mosquito is especially fond of it. In their larval form, these mosquitoes attach themselves to the roots of water plants. They are able to breath underwater, making them impossible to eliminate with larvicides (since larvicides drown mosquito eggs).  These mosquitoes are prone to transmitting EEE and can travel up to a mile at a time. They are brown or tan with darker brown stripes on their legs and abdomen.

No matter what mosquitoes are most prevalent on your property, they all have the following in common:

  • They need water to breed
  • Only the female can bite
  • Their wings beat 300 to 600 times per second
  • They can fly about 1 to 1.5 miles per hour
  • They can smell humans from 60 feet away
Mosquito Squad of SONH

The team at Mosquito Squad of SoNH

And no matter the mosquito species, Mosquito Squad of Southern New Hampshire can help you control them. We use a variety of methods to ensure that we eliminate mosquitoes no matter where they are in their lifecycle. This ensures that we are not only protecting you and your family, but we are also decreasing the mosquito population at large, which is extremely important with the arrival of spring and summer.  So don’t wait until you get bitten. Be proactive.  Give us a call today or come visit us at the NH State Home Show, booth #1202,  this weekend at the Radisson Center of Central New Hampshire to talk to us about protecting your family this season.  • (603) 373 – 8863 • email: sonh@mosquitosquad.com

New Hampshire State Parks offer great mosquito advice

The New Hampshire State Park Association released some very good advice on preventing mosquito bites.  It explains that both Eastern Equine Encephalitis and West Nile disease are predominately spread by mosquitoes.  You can read the full article here.  Another great way to protect your family all year long is through the highly effective and affordable barrier treatments offered by Mosquito Squad!  A Mosquito Squad professional in your area will gladly give great advice to help keep those troublesome, and possibly dangerous, pests at bay.